With 84% of American adults using the Internet, it’s surprising to think that many organizations today, particularly small businesses, still choose not to invest a bit of time and resources towards building their own website.

The following infographic reveals common excuses why 46% of small businesses still don’t have a website, with counter-arguments for each excuse.

If you need to talk to a prospective client who has apprehensions about having a website, why don’t you show them this infographic?

View Larger Version

Infographic containing excuses why small businesses don't have a website in 2016.

This infographic was first published on RapidWebLaunch Blog. It has been republished here with permission from the creator.

Related Content

Patrick Antinozzi is the owner of RapidWebLaunch. Follow his journey to build a location-free business on his blog and newsletter. When he’s not building things online, you’ll find him playing hockey or ranting about the Montreal Canadiens.

The post The Excuses for Not Having a Website (Infographic) appeared first on Six Revisions.

With 84% of American adults using the Internet, it’s surprising to think that many organizations today, particularly small businesses, still choose not to invest a bit of time and resources towards building their own website.

The following infographic reveals common excuses why 46% of small businesses still don’t have a website, with counter-arguments for each excuse.

If you need to talk to a prospective client who has apprehensions about having a website, why don’t you show them this infographic?

View Larger Version

Infographic containing excuses why small businesses don't have a website in 2016.

This infographic was first published on RapidWebLaunch Blog. It has been republished here with permission from the creator.

Related Content

Patrick Antinozzi is the owner of RapidWebLaunch. Follow his journey to build a location-free business on his blog and newsletter. When he’s not building things online, you’ll find him playing hockey or ranting about the Montreal Canadiens.

The post The Excuses for Not Having a Website (Infographic) appeared first on Six Revisions.

With 84% of American adults using the Internet, it’s surprising to think that many organizations today, particularly small businesses, still choose not to invest a bit of time and resources towards building their own website.

The following infographic reveals common excuses why 46% of small businesses still don’t have a website, with counter-arguments for each excuse.

If you need to talk to a prospective client who has apprehensions about having a website, why don’t you show them this infographic?

View Larger Version

Infographic containing excuses why small businesses don't have a website in 2016.

This infographic was first published on RapidWebLaunch Blog. It has been republished here with permission from the creator.

Related Content

Patrick Antinozzi is the owner of RapidWebLaunch. Follow his journey to build a location-free business on his blog and newsletter. When he’s not building things online, you’ll find him playing hockey or ranting about the Montreal Canadiens.

The post The Excuses for Not Having a Website (Infographic) appeared first on Six Revisions.

As Art Director over at Vintage, I have had the opportunity to build and grow an outstanding web design team. Together, our team has managed to work on plenty of innovative, award-winning projects. I would like to share some of my tips and techniques for hiring, helping cultivate the skills of team members, and creating a productive team culture.

Hiring

In the web design industry, there is no shortage of potential employees. A highly-driven individual with a bit of talent, a computer, and Internet access has the capacity to learn the basics of web design. This low barrier to entry is a blessing and curse—as an employer, you have to put in a lot of time and hard work to find a gem in a pile of rhinestones.

To help choose and make sure potential team members are a good fit for our design team, I use these five principles:

  • Start with a lot, end up with a few. The larger you initial pool of candidates, the better your chances are of getting at least one qualified candidate to the interview process. Don’t be afraid to screen out tens and even hundreds of resumes and work samples. Talented people are extremely rare, but they are out there. In my experience, out of about 100 people, only 2 to 3 end up being qualified.
  • Look for team members who want to work for you. A person who knows nothing about your design agency, or one who doesn’t value the mission and vision of your organization, is quite frankly not a good investment. A candidate who clearly recognizes they will be working for a great web agency will be more driven, happy, and motivated.
  • Don’t hire seniors and middles. For me, it’s worth the effort to find people with potential—a newly-minted designer who might not have the experience and skills yet, but who displays the willingness to grow and learn. This gives me the chance to direct that potential in my own watercourse. When you bring people up, they adjust easily to your style and vision. With accomplished designers, sometimes egos and stubborn habits get in the way of team cooperation.
  • No country for the lone wolves! Every designer has to be focused on their inner-self to some extent, in order to give birth to new ideas. On the other hand, teamwork can’t happen without communication. If a person is not eager to chat, they will likely not integrate into the team well. If a person likes working alone, a better option for them would be to become a freelancer or to start their own agency. But in a large web production studio, you have to be a part of the team.
  • Leverage your social network. This technique is rather straightforward, yet it’s drastically underestimated: When it comes to hiring, take advantage of your network, both online and offline. People who follow you on social media, Dribbble, Behance, those who attend your lectures, people you have met in conferences, and so forth. One other thing I do is I encourage young designers to send me their work, and I give them a design critique for free. If the person is open to constructive feedback, and uses it as a tool to educate themselves and evolve as a designer, I know I will have a great candidate once I need to add a member to my team.

Growth

So, let’s say you have found and hired some people. Your job isn’t done, it has just begun. Here’s my advice for cultivating the skills of your team members and helping them flourish in their roles:

  • Encourage continuous learning and improvement. This is going to sound harsh, but in my experience, a junior designer who stays at junior level for more than 6 months will probably never grow within the organization. A new employee must be able to improve their skills and work capacity, and be able to handle more than you require from them without external motivation. In other words, a junior designer must have a self-driven desire to learn and work hard.
  • Inspire excellence. I make it a rule for my team members to study the Awwwards daily ratings (Full disclosure: I’m a member of the Awwwards jury). When you regularly look at award-winning designs, you will have the opportunity to learn from other people’s successes.
  • Promote the idea that hard work drives success. A designer who is set to become more than they are, in my opinion, should never put salary at the forefront of their priorities. A designer who finds passion in creating things, making the world a nicer place to live in, who puts their soul into every creation, will achieve success in due course. Lust for money never pays off. On the other hand, if a person’s primary goal is to become the best at what they do, money will most certainly follow.
  • Give critiques regularly. Critique can be a tough pill to swallow for some. This is especially true for creative minds. Team members that see critique as a tool for self-improvement are the ones who take a step up the ladder. Conversely, the ones who fail to embrace constructive feedback often have a hard time advancing in their careers.
  • Be a mentor. Every budding designer needs a source of inspiration, a visionary who can guide their concepts until they are bold enough to produce their own. In every trade, mentors play a major role in the making of a successful professional. An effective leader must be a catalyst for creativity and innovation.

Team Culture

Eventually, you will be able to help junior designers become calibrated to the standards, culture, style, and other base requirements of your design team. But what will it take for you to help them progress towards producing masterwork-quality designs?

  • Encourage a teamwork-friendly culture. A team is not just a group of people overseen by a person in a fancy chair. An effective team is one where everyone has each other’s backs. It’s crucial that team members don’t compete with each other but instead share their knowledge, blunders, and experience with the team. This way, they will never run short of inspiration sources, and will learn from each other’s achievements and mistakes.
  • Develop a workspace that’s favorable to creativity. Ideas and productivity depends a lot on a person’s emotional, intellectual, and physical well-being. A designer must be inspired by their surroundings. Therefore, it is important to accommodate them in a workplace that encourages creation.
  • Engage and encourage communication. Hold briefings, roundtables, and coffee breaks often. Discuss your projects. Create a culture wherein a team member isn’t afraid to share ideas and opinions, even if they contradict with yours. A team leader who values everyone’s contribution is an effective one.
  • Make the wheel turn by itself. When I hired my first three designers, I guided them personally through workflow, schedules, and procedures. But when I took in the fourth one, I left his accommodation to be handled by the previous three. This way of team organization further contributes to mutual understanding and partner attitude.
  • Show your team you care. The well-being of your designers will reflect upon your projects. A good leader never forgets that we are all human. No one benefits if a designer is too exhausted and burned out from being forced to work day and night, non-stop. Commitment, dedication, and hard work has to be rewarded, and it’s a good idea to give a team member who has recently went above and beyond the call of duty a less-burdening task or even a mini-vacation after a big project is successfully finished.

 

My grandfather told me once that hard work makes a person. I never really believed that until I became an art director.

Many people think that design is an innate ability, as if a person is born with (or without) a special gift that somehow automatically allows them to create world-class designs.

But looking back at my experience, I can undoubtedly say that even the most talented designers in the world would not be able to achieve their level of success without a strong desire to keep learning and improving, the hunger to be the best at what they do, and the diligence to put in the hard work. These are the concepts that must be championed in a design team.

If you manage to build a team that has continuous self-improvement, excellence, and hard work as its foundation, there will truly be no project on this earth that’s impossible for you to do.

Principles of Building an Award-Winning Design Team

Below is a visual of the tips and techniques discussed in this article. You may want to print this image for future reference. Click the image to enlarge it.

Principles of building an award-winning design team

Related Content

Olga Shevchenko is a Jury at Awwwards, CSSDA, and Art Director at Vintage, one of the most awarded agencies in Eastern Europe.

The post How to Build an Award-Winning Web Design Team appeared first on Six Revisions.


I started a GoodUI YouTube Channel which includes a BetterUI video series. The idea for BetterUI is to review popular sites from the perspective of increasing conversions using some of the goodui.org ideas.

As one example of a BetterUI video, here are 10 ideas for Uber.com’s Driver Signup screens. Additional videos will get added gradually over time. For each video I also try to express my level of certainty to separate the stronger ideas from the weaker ones.

Watch The Sketched Solutions In The BetterUI Course

You can also watch me think/design the solutions for the identified issues in the BetterUI videos. In the 10 part video course I sketch out follow up concepts using Adobe Illustrator.

Subscribe On YouTube For More

Credits: Jakub Linowski

Data doesn’t have to be boring. Adding a dash of visual appeal to raw data can make it easily comprehensible and instantly appealing.

In the interest of (1) making your data more user-friendly and (2) not boring the eyes out of anyone who sees your work, picking a trusty data visualization tool is a must.

With so many tools out there, choosing the right one that serves your specific needs can be a tedious task. As a first step, read this detailed guide on the factors to consider when choosing your perfect data visualization tool.

I’ve studied the most popular free data visualization tools available out there, and in this post I’ll talk about my top picks.

1. D3.js

D3.js — often times, it’s simply called D3 — is the most well-known data visualization library today.

D3 gives developers the ability to create even the most complex charts and graphs. It uses open web technologies — HTML, SVG, and CSS — which is great if you care about cross-platform support (because iOS/Android apps, desktop apps, web browsers, and other such platforms can all run these web technologies).

Note that D3 is designed for modern browsers. It won’t work with old browsers–anything before IE9, and you might have browser compatibility issues. Another thing to consider is that working with D3 will require you to invest some time into learning the D3 API. However, once you learn how to use it, D3 can be an insanely powerful data visualization tool.

D3 is an open source project. Be sure to check out this gallery of D3 examples.

D3.js

2. FusionCharts

FusionCharts has a collection of over 90 charts and more than 960 maps which can serve the full range of needs of developers and professional data visualization experts. With its support going all the way back to the ancient IE6, browser compatibility is hardly an issue.

FusionCharts is device/platform-agnostic and works easily with both JSON and XML data formats. Here is a sample of their data visualization capabilities. While FusionCharts is slightly heavier on the pocket as compared to some of the other tools in this list, it lets you try all the charts for free before you decide to purchase it.

Also check out their nice comparison table of the top JavaScript charting libraries on their website.

FusionCharts

3. Tableau Public

Tableau Public is capable, easy to use, and free. What more can you want? With a huge arsenal of maps, graphs, and charts, it is a firm favorite for the non-developer audience.

The free version of Tableau attaches a big footer of Tableau branding in the charts you generate; non-commercial customers may be OK with that, but if you aren’t, you can pay to get the cleaner, brand-free versions of the same charts.

Take a look at this visualization of the history of the Dow 30 to get an idea of what Tableau can do for your data visualization projects.

Tableau Public

4. Charted

Charted has one of the cleanest user interfaces amongst all the charting tools I’ve seen. It’s extremely easy to use as well. All you have to do is upload a CSV file, or a Google Sheets link, and it’ll generate the chart for you. Moreover, it refreshes your chart every 30 minutes, so your chart’s data source remains fairly up-to-date.

The Charted service is free, and its source code is also freely available if you would like to run it on your own web server.

Charted

5. Google Charts

Google Charts is user-friendly and compatible with all browsers and platforms. It covers a wide range of data visualization types — from simple line and bar graphs to complex hierarchical tree maps — making Google charts suitable for almost any project.

Check out the gallery that showcases the various charts and visualizations that Google Charts offers.

Google Charts

6. Flot

Flot is an easy-to-use charting library that provides very elegant charts and graphs. It allows advanced user-interactions like panning, zooming, resizing, switching a data series on and off, and more.

Flot has a wide variety of other user-created plugins available from the community for everything, from new plot types to advanced labels.

View some videos to learn how to use Flot.

Flot

7. Chartist.js

If you’re transitioning from Excel and looking for something that doesn’t seem so old-school, you’ve got to give Chartist a look. Created — like all good products — out of frustration with the status quo, it includes a large array of charts that are responsive, animated, and rendered beautifully.

Unlike other bloated apps, Chartist is a small JS library weighing in at 10kb with no dependencies. Oh, and it’s also free. You can check out some nice examples here.

Chartist

8. Highcharts

Highcharts, another big name in the data visualization domain, offers you a wide selection of charts and maps. They offer many plugins that allow you to experience all of its powerful features without needing to deal with JavaScript.

Highcharts is free for non-commercial purposes.

Highcharts

9. Datawrapper

Datawrapper is an extremely easy-to-use data visualization tool for plotting interactive charts. All you need to do is upload your data via a CSV file, choose the chart you want to plot, and that’s basically it, you’re good to go! It’s a very popular tool among journalists, often using Datawrapper to embed live charts into their news articles.

The fact that it’s a tool of choice for most of the non-techie people out there tells you how easy Datawrapper is to use. Read this tutorial to get started with Datawrapper.

Datawrapper

10. dygraphs

dygraphs is a JavaScript charting library that allows for panning, zooming, and mouseover actions. It handles and interprets dense data sets very effectively. dygraphs can support browsers as far back as IE8 without any browser support issues.

Look at the dygraphs demo gallery to see the possible variations when using this wonderful data visualization tool.

dygraphs

11. Raw

Raw bridges the gap between spreadsheets and vector graphics. It’s built on the D3.js platform. If you’re not a programmer, Raw could be the perfect data visualization tool for you.

Raw provides a selection of 16 ready-to-use chart types. Customization is one of the biggest positive aspects of Raw, for it allows you to use your own custom layouts.

Watch this short video to see how Raw works.

]

12. TimelineJS

TimelineJS is a great tool for creating interactive, visually rich timelines without having to write code. Popular sites like TIME and Radiolab use it frequently to create timelines that display a great deal of information in a small area.

TimelineJS has built-in API support for a variety of data sources like Wikipedia, Twitter, SoundCloud, Vine, Google Maps, and YouTube.

Here’s an example of a timeline developed with TimelineJS.

Timeline JS

13. Polymaps

As its name suggests, Polymaps is for creating catographical data visualizations. It pulls in data from OpenStreetMap, Bing, and other map image providers, while also rendering its own representations. Both its image- and vector-based maps look stunning, as you can see from their wide range of examples.

Polymaps

Which Data Visualization Tool is Right For You?

At the risk of prompting a resounding groan from you: It truly depends. Whether you’re looking for a lightweight solution like Chartist, something extremely detailed and capable like D3 or FusionCharts, or even a tool dedicated to mapping (Polymaps) or timeline plotting (TimelineJS), you’ve got a rich range of free resources out there.

At the very least, I encourage you to play around with one or two new tools that fit the bill of your current data visualization project.

Related Content

Using Charts and Graphs for Content

Designing By Numbers: Data Analysis for Web Designers

40 Useful and Creative Infographics

Vikas Lalwani is a Web developer who likes to have fun with front-end technologies. He lives in Bangalore, India. You can see some of his work on his website. He’s always available for a quick chat on Twitter. Connect with him on GitHub.

The post 13 Free Data Visualization Tools appeared first on Six Revisions.

Data doesn’t have to be boring. Adding a dash of visual appeal to raw data can make it easily comprehensible and instantly appealing.

In the interest of (1) making your data more user-friendly and (2) not boring the eyes out of anyone who sees your work, picking a trusty data visualization tool is a must.

With so many tools out there, choosing the right one that serves your specific needs can be a tedious task. As a first step, read this detailed guide on the factors to consider when choosing your perfect data visualization tool.

I’ve studied the most popular free data visualization tools available out there, and in this post I’ll talk about my top picks.

1. D3.js

D3.js — often times, it’s simply called D3 — is the most well-known data visualization library today.

D3 gives developers the ability to create even the most complex charts and graphs. It uses open web technologies — HTML, SVG, and CSS — which is great if you care about cross-platform support (because iOS/Android apps, desktop apps, web browsers, and other such platforms can all run these web technologies).

Note that D3 is designed for modern browsers. It won’t work with old browsers–anything before IE9, and you might have browser compatibility issues. Another thing to consider is that working with D3 will require you to invest some time into learning the D3 API. However, once you learn how to use it, D3 can be an insanely powerful data visualization tool.

D3 is an open source project. Be sure to check out this gallery of D3 examples.

D3.js

2. FusionCharts

FusionCharts has a collection of over 90 charts and more than 960 maps which can serve the full range of needs of developers and professional data visualization experts. With its support going all the way back to the ancient IE6, browser compatibility is hardly an issue.

FusionCharts is device/platform-agnostic and works easily with both JSON and XML data formats. Here is a sample of their data visualization capabilities. While FusionCharts is slightly heavier on the pocket as compared to some of the other tools in this list, it lets you try all the charts for free before you decide to purchase it.

Also check out their nice comparison table of the top JavaScript charting libraries on their website.

FusionCharts

3. Tableau Public

Tableau Public is capable, easy to use, and free. What more can you want? With a huge arsenal of maps, graphs, and charts, it is a firm favorite for the non-developer audience.

The free version of Tableau attaches a big footer of Tableau branding in the charts you generate; non-commercial customers may be OK with that, but if you aren’t, you can pay to get the cleaner, brand-free versions of the same charts.

Take a look at this visualization of the history of the Dow 30 to get an idea of what Tableau can do for your data visualization projects.

Tableau Public

4. Charted

Charted has one of the cleanest user interfaces amongst all the charting tools I’ve seen. It’s extremely easy to use as well. All you have to do is upload a CSV file, or a Google Sheets link, and it’ll generate the chart for you. Moreover, it refreshes your chart every 30 minutes, so your chart’s data source remains fairly up-to-date.

The Charted service is free, and its source code is also freely available if you would like to run it on your own web server.

Charted

5. Google Charts

Google Charts is user-friendly and compatible with all browsers and platforms. It covers a wide range of data visualization types — from simple line and bar graphs to complex hierarchical tree maps — making Google charts suitable for almost any project.

Check out the gallery that showcases the various charts and visualizations that Google Charts offers.

Google Charts

6. Flot

Flot is an easy-to-use charting library that provides very elegant charts and graphs. It allows advanced user-interactions like panning, zooming, resizing, switching a data series on and off, and more.

Flot has a wide variety of other user-created plugins available from the community for everything, from new plot types to advanced labels.

View some videos to learn how to use Flot.

Flot

7. Chartist.js

If you’re transitioning from Excel and looking for something that doesn’t seem so old-school, you’ve got to give Chartist a look. Created — like all good products — out of frustration with the status quo, it includes a large array of charts that are responsive, animated, and rendered beautifully.

Unlike other bloated apps, Chartist is a small JS library weighing in at 10kb with no dependencies. Oh, and it’s also free. You can check out some nice examples here.

Chartist

8. Highcharts

Highcharts, another big name in the data visualization domain, offers you a wide selection of charts and maps. They offer many plugins that allow you to experience all of its powerful features without needing to deal with JavaScript.

Highcharts is free for non-commercial purposes.

Highcharts

9. Datawrapper

Datawrapper is an extremely easy-to-use data visualization tool for plotting interactive charts. All you need to do is upload your data via a CSV file, choose the chart you want to plot, and that’s basically it, you’re good to go! It’s a very popular tool among journalists, often using Datawrapper to embed live charts into their news articles.

The fact that it’s a tool of choice for most of the non-techie people out there tells you how easy Datawrapper is to use. Read this tutorial to get started with Datawrapper.

Datawrapper

10. dygraphs

dygraphs is a JavaScript charting library that allows for panning, zooming, and mouseover actions. It handles and interprets dense data sets very effectively. dygraphs can support browsers as far back as IE8 without any browser support issues.

Look at the dygraphs demo gallery to see the possible variations when using this wonderful data visualization tool.

dygraphs

11. Raw

Raw bridges the gap between spreadsheets and vector graphics. It’s built on the D3.js platform. If you’re not a programmer, Raw could be the perfect data visualization tool for you.

Raw provides a selection of 16 ready-to-use chart types. Customization is one of the biggest positive aspects of Raw, for it allows you to use your own custom layouts.

Watch this short video to see how Raw works.

]

12. TimelineJS

TimelineJS is a great tool for creating interactive, visually rich timelines without having to write code. Popular sites like TIME and Radiolab use it frequently to create timelines that display a great deal of information in a small area.

TimelineJS has built-in API support for a variety of data sources like Wikipedia, Twitter, SoundCloud, Vine, Google Maps, and YouTube.

Here’s an example of a timeline developed with TimelineJS.

Timeline JS

13. Polymaps

As its name suggests, Polymaps is for creating catographical data visualizations. It pulls in data from OpenStreetMap, Bing, and other map image providers, while also rendering its own representations. Both its image- and vector-based maps look stunning, as you can see from their wide range of examples.

Polymaps

Which Data Visualization Tool is Right For You?

At the risk of prompting a resounding groan from you: It truly depends. Whether you’re looking for a lightweight solution like Chartist, something extremely detailed and capable like D3 or FusionCharts, or even a tool dedicated to mapping (Polymaps) or timeline plotting (TimelineJS), you’ve got a rich range of free resources out there.

At the very least, I encourage you to play around with one or two new tools that fit the bill of your current data visualization project.

Related Content

Using Charts and Graphs for Content

Designing By Numbers: Data Analysis for Web Designers

40 Useful and Creative Infographics

Vikas Lalwani is a Web developer who likes to have fun with front-end technologies. He lives in Bangalore, India. You can see some of his work on his website. He’s always available for a quick chat on Twitter. Connect with him on GitHub.

The post 13 Free Data Visualization Tools appeared first on Six Revisions.

Data doesn’t have to be boring. Adding a dash of visual appeal to raw data can make it easily comprehensible and instantly appealing.

In the interest of (1) making your data more user-friendly and (2) not boring the eyes out of anyone who sees your work, picking a trusty data visualization tool is a must.

With so many tools out there, choosing the right one that serves your specific needs can be a tedious task. As a first step, read this detailed guide on the factors to consider when choosing your perfect data visualization tool.

I’ve studied the most popular free data visualization tools available out there, and in this post I’ll talk about my top picks.

1. D3.js

D3.js — often times, it’s simply called D3 — is the most well-known data visualization library today.

D3 gives developers the ability to create even the most complex charts and graphs. It uses open web technologies — HTML, SVG, and CSS — which is great if you care about cross-platform support (because iOS/Android apps, desktop apps, web browsers, and other such platforms can all run these web technologies).

Note that D3 is designed for modern browsers. It won’t work with old browsers–anything before IE9, and you might have browser compatibility issues. Another thing to consider is that working with D3 will require you to invest some time into learning the D3 API. However, once you learn how to use it, D3 can be an insanely powerful data visualization tool.

D3 is an open source project. Be sure to check out this gallery of D3 examples.

D3.js

2. FusionCharts

FusionCharts has a collection of over 90 charts and more than 960 maps which can serve the full range of needs of developers and professional data visualization experts. With its support going all the way back to the ancient IE6, browser compatibility is hardly an issue.

FusionCharts is device/platform-agnostic and works easily with both JSON and XML data formats. Here is a sample of their data visualization capabilities. While FusionCharts is slightly heavier on the pocket as compared to some of the other tools in this list, it lets you try all the charts for free before you decide to purchase it.

Also check out their nice comparison table of the top JavaScript charting libraries on their website.

FusionCharts

3. Tableau Public

Tableau Public is capable, easy to use, and free. What more can you want? With a huge arsenal of maps, graphs, and charts, it is a firm favorite for the non-developer audience.

The free version of Tableau attaches a big footer of Tableau branding in the charts you generate; non-commercial customers may be OK with that, but if you aren’t, you can pay to get the cleaner, brand-free versions of the same charts.

Take a look at this visualization of the history of the Dow 30 to get an idea of what Tableau can do for your data visualization projects.

Tableau Public

4. Charted

Charted has one of the cleanest user interfaces amongst all the charting tools I’ve seen. It’s extremely easy to use as well. All you have to do is upload a CSV file, or a Google Sheets link, and it’ll generate the chart for you. Moreover, it refreshes your chart every 30 minutes, so your chart’s data source remains fairly up-to-date.

The Charted service is free, and its source code is also freely available if you would like to run it on your own web server.

Charted

5. Google Charts

Google Charts is user-friendly and compatible with all browsers and platforms. It covers a wide range of data visualization types — from simple line and bar graphs to complex hierarchical tree maps — making Google charts suitable for almost any project.

Check out the gallery that showcases the various charts and visualizations that Google Charts offers.

Google Charts

6. Flot

Flot is an easy-to-use charting library that provides very elegant charts and graphs. It allows advanced user-interactions like panning, zooming, resizing, switching a data series on and off, and more.

Flot has a wide variety of other user-created plugins available from the community for everything, from new plot types to advanced labels.

View some videos to learn how to use Flot.

Flot

7. Chartist.js

If you’re transitioning from Excel and looking for something that doesn’t seem so old-school, you’ve got to give Chartist a look. Created — like all good products — out of frustration with the status quo, it includes a large array of charts that are responsive, animated, and rendered beautifully.

Unlike other bloated apps, Chartist is a small JS library weighing in at 10kb with no dependencies. Oh, and it’s also free. You can check out some nice examples here.

Chartist

8. Highcharts

Highcharts, another big name in the data visualization domain, offers you a wide selection of charts and maps. They offer many plugins that allow you to experience all of its powerful features without needing to deal with JavaScript.

Highcharts is free for non-commercial purposes.

Highcharts

9. Datawrapper

Datawrapper is an extremely easy-to-use data visualization tool for plotting interactive charts. All you need to do is upload your data via a CSV file, choose the chart you want to plot, and that’s basically it, you’re good to go! It’s a very popular tool among journalists, often using Datawrapper to embed live charts into their news articles.

The fact that it’s a tool of choice for most of the non-techie people out there tells you how easy Datawrapper is to use. Read this tutorial to get started with Datawrapper.

Datawrapper

10. dygraphs

dygraphs is a JavaScript charting library that allows for panning, zooming, and mouseover actions. It handles and interprets dense data sets very effectively. dygraphs can support browsers as far back as IE8 without any browser support issues.

Look at the dygraphs demo gallery to see the possible variations when using this wonderful data visualization tool.

dygraphs

11. Raw

Raw bridges the gap between spreadsheets and vector graphics. It’s built on the D3.js platform. If you’re not a programmer, Raw could be the perfect data visualization tool for you.

Raw provides a selection of 16 ready-to-use chart types. Customization is one of the biggest positive aspects of Raw, for it allows you to use your own custom layouts.

Watch this short video to see how Raw works.

]

12. TimelineJS

TimelineJS is a great tool for creating interactive, visually rich timelines without having to write code. Popular sites like TIME and Radiolab use it frequently to create timelines that display a great deal of information in a small area.

TimelineJS has built-in API support for a variety of data sources like Wikipedia, Twitter, SoundCloud, Vine, Google Maps, and YouTube.

Here’s an example of a timeline developed with TimelineJS.

Timeline JS

13. Polymaps

As its name suggests, Polymaps is for creating catographical data visualizations. It pulls in data from OpenStreetMap, Bing, and other map image providers, while also rendering its own representations. Both its image- and vector-based maps look stunning, as you can see from their wide range of examples.

Polymaps

Which Data Visualization Tool is Right For You?

At the risk of prompting a resounding groan from you: It truly depends. Whether you’re looking for a lightweight solution like Chartist, something extremely detailed and capable like D3 or FusionCharts, or even a tool dedicated to mapping (Polymaps) or timeline plotting (TimelineJS), you’ve got a rich range of free resources out there.

At the very least, I encourage you to play around with one or two new tools that fit the bill of your current data visualization project.

Related Content

Using Charts and Graphs for Content

Designing By Numbers: Data Analysis for Web Designers

40 Useful and Creative Infographics

Vikas Lalwani is a Web developer who likes to have fun with front-end technologies. He lives in Bangalore, India. You can see some of his work on his website. He’s always available for a quick chat on Twitter. Connect with him on GitHub.

The post 13 Free Data Visualization Tools appeared first on Six Revisions.

Data doesn’t have to be boring. Adding a dash of visual appeal to raw data can make it easily comprehensible and instantly appealing.

In the interest of (1) making your data more user-friendly and (2) not boring the eyes out of anyone who sees your work, picking a trusty data visualization tool is a must.

With so many tools out there, choosing the right one that serves your specific needs can be a tedious task. As a first step, read this detailed guide on the factors to consider when choosing your perfect data visualization tool.

I’ve studied the most popular free data visualization tools available out there, and in this post I’ll talk about my top picks.

1. D3.js

D3.js — often times, it’s simply called D3 — is the most well-known data visualization library today.

D3 gives developers the ability to create even the most complex charts and graphs. It uses open web technologies — HTML, SVG, and CSS — which is great if you care about cross-platform support (because iOS/Android apps, desktop apps, web browsers, and other such platforms can all run these web technologies).

Note that D3 is designed for modern browsers. It won’t work with old browsers–anything before IE9, and you might have browser compatibility issues. Another thing to consider is that working with D3 will require you to invest some time into learning the D3 API. However, once you learn how to use it, D3 can be an insanely powerful data visualization tool.

D3 is an open source project. Be sure to check out this gallery of D3 examples.

D3.js

2. FusionCharts

FusionCharts has a collection of over 90 charts and more than 960 maps which can serve the full range of needs of developers and professional data visualization experts. With its support going all the way back to the ancient IE6, browser compatibility is hardly an issue.

FusionCharts is device/platform-agnostic and works easily with both JSON and XML data formats. Here is a sample of their data visualization capabilities. While FusionCharts is slightly heavier on the pocket as compared to some of the other tools in this list, it lets you try all the charts for free before you decide to purchase it.

Also check out their nice comparison table of the top JavaScript charting libraries on their website.

FusionCharts

3. Tableau Public

Tableau Public is capable, easy to use, and free. What more can you want? With a huge arsenal of maps, graphs, and charts, it is a firm favorite for the non-developer audience.

The free version of Tableau attaches a big footer of Tableau branding in the charts you generate; non-commercial customers may be OK with that, but if you aren’t, you can pay to get the cleaner, brand-free versions of the same charts.

Take a look at this visualization of the history of the Dow 30 to get an idea of what Tableau can do for your data visualization projects.

Tableau Public

4. Charted

Charted has one of the cleanest user interfaces amongst all the charting tools I’ve seen. It’s extremely easy to use as well. All you have to do is upload a CSV file, or a Google Sheets link, and it’ll generate the chart for you. Moreover, it refreshes your chart every 30 minutes, so your chart’s data source remains fairly up-to-date.

The Charted service is free, and its source code is also freely available if you would like to run it on your own web server.

Charted

5. Google Charts

Google Charts is user-friendly and compatible with all browsers and platforms. It covers a wide range of data visualization types — from simple line and bar graphs to complex hierarchical tree maps — making Google charts suitable for almost any project.

Check out the gallery that showcases the various charts and visualizations that Google Charts offers.

Google Charts

6. Flot

Flot is an easy-to-use charting library that provides very elegant charts and graphs. It allows advanced user-interactions like panning, zooming, resizing, switching a data series on and off, and more.

Flot has a wide variety of other user-created plugins available from the community for everything, from new plot types to advanced labels.

View some videos to learn how to use Flot.

Flot

7. Chartist.js

If you’re transitioning from Excel and looking for something that doesn’t seem so old-school, you’ve got to give Chartist a look. Created — like all good products — out of frustration with the status quo, it includes a large array of charts that are responsive, animated, and rendered beautifully.

Unlike other bloated apps, Chartist is a small JS library weighing in at 10kb with no dependencies. Oh, and it’s also free. You can check out some nice examples here.

Chartist

8. Highcharts

Highcharts, another big name in the data visualization domain, offers you a wide selection of charts and maps. They offer many plugins that allow you to experience all of its powerful features without needing to deal with JavaScript.

Highcharts is free for non-commercial purposes.

Highcharts

9. Datawrapper

Datawrapper is an extremely easy-to-use data visualization tool for plotting interactive charts. All you need to do is upload your data via a CSV file, choose the chart you want to plot, and that’s basically it, you’re good to go! It’s a very popular tool among journalists, often using Datawrapper to embed live charts into their news articles.

The fact that it’s a tool of choice for most of the non-techie people out there tells you how easy Datawrapper is to use. Read this tutorial to get started with Datawrapper.

Datawrapper

10. dygraphs

dygraphs is a JavaScript charting library that allows for panning, zooming, and mouseover actions. It handles and interprets dense data sets very effectively. dygraphs can support browsers as far back as IE8 without any browser support issues.

Look at the dygraphs demo gallery to see the possible variations when using this wonderful data visualization tool.

dygraphs

11. Raw

Raw bridges the gap between spreadsheets and vector graphics. It’s built on the D3.js platform. If you’re not a programmer, Raw could be the perfect data visualization tool for you.

Raw provides a selection of 16 ready-to-use chart types. Customization is one of the biggest positive aspects of Raw, for it allows you to use your own custom layouts.

Watch this short video to see how Raw works.

]

12. TimelineJS

TimelineJS is a great tool for creating interactive, visually rich timelines without having to write code. Popular sites like TIME and Radiolab use it frequently to create timelines that display a great deal of information in a small area.

TimelineJS has built-in API support for a variety of data sources like Wikipedia, Twitter, SoundCloud, Vine, Google Maps, and YouTube.

Here’s an example of a timeline developed with TimelineJS.

Timeline JS

13. Polymaps

As its name suggests, Polymaps is for creating catographical data visualizations. It pulls in data from OpenStreetMap, Bing, and other map image providers, while also rendering its own representations. Both its image- and vector-based maps look stunning, as you can see from their wide range of examples.

Polymaps

Which Data Visualization Tool is Right For You?

At the risk of prompting a resounding groan from you: It truly depends. Whether you’re looking for a lightweight solution like Chartist, something extremely detailed and capable like D3 or FusionCharts, or even a tool dedicated to mapping (Polymaps) or timeline plotting (TimelineJS), you’ve got a rich range of free resources out there.

At the very least, I encourage you to play around with one or two new tools that fit the bill of your current data visualization project.

Related Content

Using Charts and Graphs for Content

Designing By Numbers: Data Analysis for Web Designers

40 Useful and Creative Infographics

Vikas Lalwani is a Web developer who likes to have fun with front-end technologies. He lives in Bangalore, India. You can see some of his work on his website. He’s always available for a quick chat on Twitter. Connect with him on GitHub.

The post 13 Free Data Visualization Tools appeared first on Six Revisions.

Data doesn’t have to be boring. Adding a dash of visual appeal to raw data can make it easily comprehensible and instantly appealing.

In the interest of (1) making your data more user-friendly and (2) not boring the eyes out of anyone who sees your work, picking a trusty data visualization tool is a must.

With so many tools out there, choosing the right one that serves your specific needs can be a tedious task. As a first step, read this detailed guide on the factors to consider when choosing your perfect data visualization tool.

I’ve studied the most popular free data visualization tools available out there, and in this post I’ll talk about my top picks.

1. D3.js

D3.js — often times, it’s simply called D3 — is the most well-known data visualization library today.

D3 gives developers the ability to create even the most complex charts and graphs. It uses open web technologies — HTML, SVG, and CSS — which is great if you care about cross-platform support (because iOS/Android apps, desktop apps, web browsers, and other such platforms can all run these web technologies).

Note that D3 is designed for modern browsers. It won’t work with old browsers–anything before IE9, and you might have browser compatibility issues. Another thing to consider is that working with D3 will require you to invest some time into learning the D3 API. However, once you learn how to use it, D3 can be an insanely powerful data visualization tool.

D3 is an open source project. Be sure to check out this gallery of D3 examples.

D3.js

2. FusionCharts

FusionCharts has a collection of over 90 charts and more than 960 maps which can serve the full range of needs of developers and professional data visualization experts. With its support going all the way back to the ancient IE6, browser compatibility is hardly an issue.

FusionCharts is device/platform-agnostic and works easily with both JSON and XML data formats. Here is a sample of their data visualization capabilities. While FusionCharts is slightly heavier on the pocket as compared to some of the other tools in this list, it lets you try all the charts for free before you decide to purchase it.

Also check out their nice comparison table of the top JavaScript charting libraries on their website.

FusionCharts

3. Tableau Public

Tableau Public is capable, easy to use, and free. What more can you want? With a huge arsenal of maps, graphs, and charts, it is a firm favorite for the non-developer audience.

The free version of Tableau attaches a big footer of Tableau branding in the charts you generate; non-commercial customers may be OK with that, but if you aren’t, you can pay to get the cleaner, brand-free versions of the same charts.

Take a look at this visualization of the history of the Dow 30 to get an idea of what Tableau can do for your data visualization projects.

Tableau Public

4. Charted

Charted has one of the cleanest user interfaces amongst all the charting tools I’ve seen. It’s extremely easy to use as well. All you have to do is upload a CSV file, or a Google Sheets link, and it’ll generate the chart for you. Moreover, it refreshes your chart every 30 minutes, so your chart’s data source remains fairly up-to-date.

The Charted service is free, and its source code is also freely available if you would like to run it on your own web server.

Charted

5. Google Charts

Google Charts is user-friendly and compatible with all browsers and platforms. It covers a wide range of data visualization types — from simple line and bar graphs to complex hierarchical tree maps — making Google charts suitable for almost any project.

Check out the gallery that showcases the various charts and visualizations that Google Charts offers.

Google Charts

6. Flot

Flot is an easy-to-use charting library that provides very elegant charts and graphs. It allows advanced user-interactions like panning, zooming, resizing, switching a data series on and off, and more.

Flot has a wide variety of other user-created plugins available from the community for everything, from new plot types to advanced labels.

View some videos to learn how to use Flot.

Flot

7. Chartist.js

If you’re transitioning from Excel and looking for something that doesn’t seem so old-school, you’ve got to give Chartist a look. Created — like all good products — out of frustration with the status quo, it includes a large array of charts that are responsive, animated, and rendered beautifully.

Unlike other bloated apps, Chartist is a small JS library weighing in at 10kb with no dependencies. Oh, and it’s also free. You can check out some nice examples here.

Chartist

8. Highcharts

Highcharts, another big name in the data visualization domain, offers you a wide selection of charts and maps. They offer many plugins that allow you to experience all of its powerful features without needing to deal with JavaScript.

Highcharts is free for non-commercial purposes.

Highcharts

9. Datawrapper

Datawrapper is an extremely easy-to-use data visualization tool for plotting interactive charts. All you need to do is upload your data via a CSV file, choose the chart you want to plot, and that’s basically it, you’re good to go! It’s a very popular tool among journalists, often using Datawrapper to embed live charts into their news articles.

The fact that it’s a tool of choice for most of the non-techie people out there tells you how easy Datawrapper is to use. Read this tutorial to get started with Datawrapper.

Datawrapper

10. dygraphs

dygraphs is a JavaScript charting library that allows for panning, zooming, and mouseover actions. It handles and interprets dense data sets very effectively. dygraphs can support browsers as far back as IE8 without any browser support issues.

Look at the dygraphs demo gallery to see the possible variations when using this wonderful data visualization tool.

dygraphs

11. Raw

Raw bridges the gap between spreadsheets and vector graphics. It’s built on the D3.js platform. If you’re not a programmer, Raw could be the perfect data visualization tool for you.

Raw provides a selection of 16 ready-to-use chart types. Customization is one of the biggest positive aspects of Raw, for it allows you to use your own custom layouts.

Watch this short video to see how Raw works.

]

12. TimelineJS

TimelineJS is a great tool for creating interactive, visually rich timelines without having to write code. Popular sites like TIME and Radiolab use it frequently to create timelines that display a great deal of information in a small area.

TimelineJS has built-in API support for a variety of data sources like Wikipedia, Twitter, SoundCloud, Vine, Google Maps, and YouTube.

Here’s an example of a timeline developed with TimelineJS.

Timeline JS

13. Polymaps

As its name suggests, Polymaps is for creating catographical data visualizations. It pulls in data from OpenStreetMap, Bing, and other map image providers, while also rendering its own representations. Both its image- and vector-based maps look stunning, as you can see from their wide range of examples.

Polymaps

Which Data Visualization Tool is Right For You?

At the risk of prompting a resounding groan from you: It truly depends. Whether you’re looking for a lightweight solution like Chartist, something extremely detailed and capable like D3 or FusionCharts, or even a tool dedicated to mapping (Polymaps) or timeline plotting (TimelineJS), you’ve got a rich range of free resources out there.

At the very least, I encourage you to play around with one or two new tools that fit the bill of your current data visualization project.

Related Content

Using Charts and Graphs for Content

Designing By Numbers: Data Analysis for Web Designers

40 Useful and Creative Infographics

Vikas Lalwani is a Web developer who likes to have fun with front-end technologies. He lives in Bangalore, India. You can see some of his work on his website. He’s always available for a quick chat on Twitter. Connect with him on GitHub.

The post 13 Free Data Visualization Tools appeared first on Six Revisions.

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