Pidoco
What if you could create a complete set of amazing wireframes in just a few hours? What if you could make these wireframes behave like an actual app so that users can click through them? And what if you could not only click through them, but also simulate touch and swipe gestures, page transitions and test how a mobile app reacts when the user tilts or turns their phone or changes their location?

Berlin-based Pidoco has just released a set of new features which allow designers, analysts and UX folk to prototype a vast range of interactions in their wireframes in order to simulate realistic interactive behavior of future applications. Pidoco’s “Extended Interactions” work on both stationary PCs and mobile devices like tablets and smartphones and thus allow designers and developers to test drive applications in a realistic setting at an early stage.

Wireframes are built in the web browser, but can be simulated on iOS and Android devices using the Pidoco App. Users need no programming knowledge to use Extended Interactions, since you can define them easily via a convenient “Interaction Dialog”. All you need to do is select from a variety of options a trigger (e.g. swipe, pinch, click, hover, device flip) and the corresponding reaction (e.g. show a new page, display a pop-up, slide in a new screen, play a sound or even place a call).

Pidoco’s Interaction Dialog allows users to easily define advanced interactions

A screen section called “My Interactions” allows users to manage interactions, which makes it easy to copy an interaction to other elements or find elements that share the same interaction.

Simulation of an interactive Pidoco prototype in scribble mode

In addition, Pidoco offers a number of other features which make it a great tool to work with, such as real-time collaboration à la Google Docs, a commenting and discussion feature, different types of templates including so-called “global layers” that work like layers in Photoshop, an automatic specification document generator, various export options, a wide selection of UI elements and icons that you can expand by uploading your own images, versioning, an issue tracker, an API against which you can write your own code, and much more.

In light of its latest release, Pidoco is offering a special deal to all Wireframes Magazine readers. You can now sign up for a free trial and get 50% off on all annual Pidoco plans purchased before August 15, 2014, using the promotion code wm2014.

Get It Now

When your profession involves writing code for significantly long periods of time, even deceptively trivial things such the font you’re using can make a huge difference.

This is a list of fonts for people who love code.

For your convenience, I have created a sample page for all the fonts mentioned here, which may help you choose the one that’s right for you.

Programming Fonts Sample Page

View source on GitHub

Selection Criteria

Here are the factors used for choosing the fonts in this list.

Monospaced

A good font that’s used for programming should be monospaced, meaning each character occupies the same amount of horizontal space1. Monospaced fonts are also called fixed-width fonts.

Using a fixed-width font is essential for formatting and readability of source code.

Screen readability and legibility

When you have to stare at code for hours, reading comfort is really important.

In addition, research shows that fonts can affect the user experience; typography has measurable cognitive effects on our mood2, which, in turn, could have indirect implications towards our productivity.

Preferably, the font we choose is explicitly designed with coding in mind, and is optimized especially for on-screen/computer-monitor readability.

Readability is a subjective matter — what’s easy for me to read, might not be so for you. The programming fonts sample page can be used as a rudimentary tool for evaluating the readability and legibility of each font in this list.

Unambiguous characters

To avoid syntax errors, we should be able to effortlessly distinguish between similar characters such as l, 1, | and I when we’re writing/reading code. Programmers shouldn’t have to wonder whether they typed 0, O or o, or whether a string value is wrapped with backticks (``) or apostrophes ('').

The sample page has a code block that contains potentially ambiguous characters so that you are able to test a particular font’s legibility.

Truly free

The best programming fonts are free and open-sourced in my opinion. And, particularly for those of us who are web developers, we’d like to not have to worry about whether or not we can render the font in the browser as part of a UI design.

My intention with this list is to highlight free fonts that are truly free. Some popular programming fonts — fonts that I also personally love, such as Consolas and Monaco — were intentionally left out because their licensing terms outside of personal use were unclear.

Reputation

A great deal of time was spent hunting down and researching the fonts for inclusion in this list. This activity led me to fonts that are well-loved by the programming community and helped me narrow this roundup down to a manageable size.

Personal preference

There’s always going to be some level of bias when pulling together a list like this.

There are many excellent programming fonts out there that match the criteria above, but at the end of the day this list has a major flaw and limiting factor: Me. I chose to include only the programming fonts I’m comfortable recommending to others. If you have recommendations, please share them in the comments section of this article.

The Fonts

You’ll find a table listing relevant resources and information for each font. Also, each font has multiple download links pointing to trustworthy domains in case a link stops working in the future.

Here are the ten free programming fonts.

1. Anonymous Pro

Anonymous Pro, by typeface designer Mark Simonson, was "designed especially for coders," according to its website. This font has keyboard characters like the Command key found on Apple keyboards, making it a good candidate font for displaying keyboard shortcuts on web pages and user interfaces.

Anonymous Pro resources
Official site Anonymous Pro
Useful resources Anonymous Pro specimen (PDF) (Mark Simonson)
Anonymous Pro: a programming font with style (Hivelogic)
Sites using Anonymous Pro (Typewolf)
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Mark Simonson
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

2. Cousine

If you’re a fan of the Courier font family, then you’re going to like Cousine. Cousine improves on the font family that inspired it by offering "improved on-screen readability characteristics"3. This font was made by Steve Matteson, the designer of many of the fonts you see in open source operating systems.

Cousine resources
More info Cousine (Open Font Library)
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

3. DejaVu Sans Mono

This monospaced font is a member of the DejaVu font family, an open source project. The font’s characters are markedly more robust compared to others in the same class.

DejaVu Sans Mono resources
Official site DejaVu Fonts
Useful resources DejaVu font specimen (PDF) (DejaVu Fonts)
Repo SourceForge.net
License Free license (custom)
Download links DejaVu Fonts
Font Squirrel

4. Droid Sans Mono

Part of the Droid font family, and commissioned by Google, this monospaced member promises "excellent legibility characteristics in its letterforms," according to its official description. This font functions well in code editors, but also looks good when rendered in user interfaces. Droid Sans Mono is also by Steve Matteson.

Droid Sans Mono resources
Official site Droid Sans Mono
Useful resources Droid Sans Mono great coding font (DamienG)
Font sample Droid Sans Mono (Wikipedia)
Repo GitHub
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

5. Fira Mono

The Fira font family, designed by Erik Spiekermann, was commissioned by Mozilla for their OS. This monospaced variant has excellent punctuation-mark legibility for me.

Fira Mono resources
Official site Fira Sans on the designer’s website
Useful resources Mozilla Style Guide: Firefox OS Typeface (Mozilla)
Fira specimen page (Mozilla/Github.io)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Carrois
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

6. Hermit

Hermit is "a font for programmers, by a programmer." This font is a relatively new font. It’s by Pablo Caro, whose professional background as an engineer and computer scientist, and track record of projects, make him an individual not only qualified to know what the needs of programmers are, but also an interestingly atypical designer of fonts. This monospaced font is "designed to be clear, pragmatic and very readable," according to Caro’s website. "Its creation has been focused on programming."

Hermit resources
Official site Hermit
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Pablo Caro
GitHub

7. Inconsolata

Inconsolata draws inspiration from the ubiquitous Consolas font by Microsoft. Inconsolata was developed by Raph Levien, a Google engineer currently assigned to the Android platform. Levien says on his site that though there are many great programming fonts, many of them "do not have the attention to detail for high resolution rendering."

Inconsolata resources
Official site Inconsolata
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Levien.com
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

8. Oxygen Mono

This monospaced font family is by Vernon Adams, a person who’s well-known in the open source font community. Oxygen Mono works well on the desktop. The font’s characters — and particularly, for me, its punctionation marks — have great definition and legibility.

Oxygen Mono resources
More info Oxygen Mono (Google Fonts)
Useful resources Very first drafts of ‘Oxygen Monospace’ (NewTypography)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

9. PT Mono

The PT font family was designed for the Russian language, but works equally well with the Latin alphabet. The PT Mono variation is by Alexandra Korolkova. The font’s very readable, as well as very elegant with its Humanist characteristics.

PT Mono resources
Official site ParaType Public Types Project
License SIL Open Font License
Download links ParaType
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

10. Source Code Pro

Last but certainly not the least, because it’s the programming font I’m currently using, is Source Code Pro created by Paul D. Hunt. This font is one of Adobe’s open source projects. Source Code Pro is comfortable to read and write code with.

Source Code Pro resources
Official site Source Code Pro
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

References

  1. Monospaced font (wikipedia.org)
  2. The Aesthetics of Reading (PDF) (mit.edu)
  3. Google Fonts Cousine (google.com)

Related Content

About the Author

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end web developer by profession. If you’d like to connect with him, head on over to the contact page or follow him on Twitter: @sixrevisions.

The post Top 10 Free Programming Fonts appeared first on Six Revisions.

When your profession involves writing code for significantly long periods of time, even deceptively trivial things such the font you’re using can make a huge difference.

This is a list of fonts for people who love code.

For your convenience, I have created a sample page for all the fonts mentioned here, which may help you choose the one that’s right for you.

Programming Fonts Sample Page

View source on GitHub

Selection Criteria

Here are the factors used for choosing the fonts in this list.

Monospaced

A good font that’s used for programming should be monospaced, meaning each character occupies the same amount of horizontal space1. Monospaced fonts are also called fixed-width fonts.

Using a fixed-width font is essential for formatting and readability of source code.

Screen readability and legibility

When you have to stare at code for hours, reading comfort is really important.

In addition, research shows that fonts can affect the user experience; typography has measurable cognitive effects on our mood2, which, in turn, could have indirect implications towards our productivity.

Preferably, the font we choose is explicitly designed with coding in mind, and is optimized especially for on-screen/computer-monitor readability.

Readability is a subjective matter — what’s easy for me to read, might not be so for you. The programming fonts sample page can be used as a rudimentary tool for evaluating the readability and legibility of each font in this list.

Unambiguous characters

To avoid syntax errors, we should be able to effortlessly distinguish between similar characters such as l, 1, | and I when we’re writing/reading code. Programmers shouldn’t have to wonder whether they typed 0, O or o, or whether a string value is wrapped with backticks (``) or apostrophes ('').

The sample page has a code block that contains potentially ambiguous characters so that you are able to test a particular font’s legibility.

Truly free

The best programming fonts are free and open-sourced in my opinion. And, particularly for those of us who are web developers, we’d like to not have to worry about whether or not we can render the font in the browser as part of a UI design.

My intention with this list is to highlight free fonts that are truly free. Some popular programming fonts — fonts that I also personally love, such as Consolas and Monaco — were intentionally left out because their licensing terms outside of personal use were unclear.

Reputation

A great deal of time was spent hunting down and researching the fonts for inclusion in this list. This activity led me to fonts that are well-loved by the programming community and helped me narrow this roundup down to a manageable size.

Personal preference

There’s always going to be some level of bias when pulling together a list like this.

There are many excellent programming fonts out there that match the criteria above, but at the end of the day this list has a major flaw and limiting factor: Me. I chose to include only the programming fonts I’m comfortable recommending to others. If you have recommendations, please share them in the comments section of this article.

The Fonts

You’ll find a table listing relevant resources and information for each font. Also, each font has multiple download links pointing to trustworthy domains in case a link stops working in the future.

Here are the ten free programming fonts.

1. Anonymous Pro

Anonymous Pro, by typeface designer Mark Simonson, was "designed especially for coders," according to its website. This font has keyboard characters like the Command key found on Apple keyboards, making it a good candidate font for displaying keyboard shortcuts on web pages and user interfaces.

Anonymous Pro resources
Official site Anonymous Pro
Useful resources Anonymous Pro specimen (PDF) (Mark Simonson)
Anonymous Pro: a programming font with style (Hivelogic)
Sites using Anonymous Pro (Typewolf)
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Mark Simonson
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

2. Cousine

If you’re a fan of the Courier font family, then you’re going to like Cousine. Cousine improves on the font family that inspired it by offering "improved on-screen readability characteristics"3. This font was made by Steve Matteson, the designer of many of the fonts you see in open source operating systems.

Cousine resources
More info Cousine (Open Font Library)
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

3. DejaVu Sans Mono

This monospaced font is a member of the DejaVu font family, an open source project. The font’s characters are markedly more robust compared to others in the same class.

DejaVu Sans Mono resources
Official site DejaVu Fonts
Useful resources DejaVu font specimen (PDF) (DejaVu Fonts)
Repo SourceForge.net
License Free license (custom)
Download links DejaVu Fonts
Font Squirrel

4. Droid Sans Mono

Part of the Droid font family, and commissioned by Google, this monospaced member promises "excellent legibility characteristics in its letterforms," according to its official description. This font functions well in code editors, but also looks good when rendered in user interfaces. Droid Sans Mono is also by Steve Matteson.

Droid Sans Mono resources
Official site Droid Sans Mono
Useful resources Droid Sans Mono great coding font (DamienG)
Font sample Droid Sans Mono (Wikipedia)
Repo GitHub
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

5. Fira Mono

The Fira font family, designed by Erik Spiekermann, was commissioned by Mozilla for their OS. This monospaced variant has excellent punctuation-mark legibility for me.

Fira Mono resources
Official site Fira Sans on the designer’s website
Useful resources Mozilla Style Guide: Firefox OS Typeface (Mozilla)
Fira specimen page (Mozilla/Github.io)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Carrois
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

6. Hermit

Hermit is "a font for programmers, by a programmer." This font is a relatively new font. It’s by Pablo Caro, whose professional background as an engineer and computer scientist, and track record of projects, make him an individual not only qualified to know what the needs of programmers are, but also an interestingly atypical designer of fonts. This monospaced font is "designed to be clear, pragmatic and very readable," according to Caro’s website. "Its creation has been focused on programming."

Hermit resources
Official site Hermit
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Pablo Caro
GitHub

7. Inconsolata

Inconsolata draws inspiration from the ubiquitous Consolas font by Microsoft. Inconsolata was developed by Raph Levien, a Google engineer currently assigned to the Android platform. Levien says on his site that though there are many great programming fonts, many of them "do not have the attention to detail for high resolution rendering."

Inconsolata resources
Official site Inconsolata
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Levien.com
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

8. Oxygen Mono

This monospaced font family is by Vernon Adams, a person who’s well-known in the open source font community. Oxygen Mono works well on the desktop. The font’s characters — and particularly, for me, its punctionation marks — have great definition and legibility.

Oxygen Mono resources
More info Oxygen Mono (Google Fonts)
Useful resources Very first drafts of ‘Oxygen Monospace’ (NewTypography)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

9. PT Mono

The PT font family was designed for the Russian language, but works equally well with the Latin alphabet. The PT Mono variation is by Alexandra Korolkova. The font’s very readable, as well as very elegant with its Humanist characteristics.

PT Mono resources
Official site ParaType Public Types Project
License SIL Open Font License
Download links ParaType
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

10. Source Code Pro

Last but certainly not the least, because it’s the programming font I’m currently using, is Source Code Pro created by Paul D. Hunt. This font is one of Adobe’s open source projects. Source Code Pro is comfortable to read and write code with.

Source Code Pro resources
Official site Source Code Pro
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

References

  1. Monospaced font (wikipedia.org)
  2. The Aesthetics of Reading (PDF) (mit.edu)
  3. Google Fonts Cousine (google.com)

Related Content

About the Author

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end web developer by profession. If you’d like to connect with him, head on over to the contact page or follow him on Twitter: @sixrevisions.

The post Top 10 Free Programming Fonts appeared first on Six Revisions.

When your profession involves writing code for significantly long periods of time, even deceptively trivial things such the font you’re using can make a huge difference.

This is a list of fonts for people who love code.

For your convenience, I have created a sample page for all the fonts mentioned here, which may help you choose the one that’s right for you.

Programming Fonts Sample Page

View source on GitHub

Selection Criteria

Here are the factors used for choosing the fonts in this list.

Monospaced

A good font that’s used for programming should be monospaced, meaning each character occupies the same amount of horizontal space1. Monospaced fonts are also called fixed-width fonts.

Using a fixed-width font is essential for formatting and readability of source code.

Screen readability and legibility

When you have to stare at code for hours, reading comfort is really important.

In addition, research shows that fonts can affect the user experience; typography has measurable cognitive effects on our mood2, which, in turn, could have indirect implications towards our productivity.

Preferably, the font we choose is explicitly designed with coding in mind, and is optimized especially for on-screen/computer-monitor readability.

Readability is a subjective matter — what’s easy for me to read, might not be so for you. The programming fonts sample page can be used as a rudimentary tool for evaluating the readability and legibility of each font in this list.

Unambiguous characters

To avoid syntax errors, we should be able to effortlessly distinguish between similar characters such as l, 1, | and I when we’re writing/reading code. Programmers shouldn’t have to wonder whether they typed 0, O or o, or whether a string value is wrapped with backticks (``) or apostrophes ('').

The sample page has a code block that contains potentially ambiguous characters so that you are able to test a particular font’s legibility.

Truly free

The best programming fonts are free and open-sourced in my opinion. And, particularly for those of us who are web developers, we’d like to not have to worry about whether or not we can render the font in the browser as part of a UI design.

My intention with this list is to highlight free fonts that are truly free. Some popular programming fonts — fonts that I also personally love, such as Consolas and Monaco — were intentionally left out because their licensing terms outside of personal use were unclear.

Reputation

A great deal of time was spent hunting down and researching the fonts for inclusion in this list. This activity led me to fonts that are well-loved by the programming community and helped me narrow this roundup down to a manageable size.

Personal preference

There’s always going to be some level of bias when pulling together a list like this.

There are many excellent programming fonts out there that match the criteria above, but at the end of the day this list has a major flaw and limiting factor: Me. I chose to include only the programming fonts I’m comfortable recommending to others. If you have recommendations, please share them in the comments section of this article.

The Fonts

You’ll find a table listing relevant resources and information for each font. Also, each font has multiple download links pointing to trustworthy domains in case a link stops working in the future.

Here are the ten free programming fonts.

1. Anonymous Pro

Anonymous Pro, by typeface designer Mark Simonson, was "designed especially for coders," according to its website. This font has keyboard characters like the Command key found on Apple keyboards, making it a good candidate font for displaying keyboard shortcuts on web pages and user interfaces.

Anonymous Pro resources
Official site Anonymous Pro
Useful resources Anonymous Pro specimen (PDF) (Mark Simonson)
Anonymous Pro: a programming font with style (Hivelogic)
Sites using Anonymous Pro (Typewolf)
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Mark Simonson
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

2. Cousine

If you’re a fan of the Courier font family, then you’re going to like Cousine. Cousine improves on the font family that inspired it by offering "improved on-screen readability characteristics"3. This font was made by Steve Matteson, the designer of many of the fonts you see in open source operating systems.

Cousine resources
More info Cousine (Open Font Library)
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

3. DejaVu Sans Mono

This monospaced font is a member of the DejaVu font family, an open source project. The font’s characters are markedly more robust compared to others in the same class.

DejaVu Sans Mono resources
Official site DejaVu Fonts
Useful resources DejaVu font specimen (PDF) (DejaVu Fonts)
Repo SourceForge.net
License Free license (custom)
Download links DejaVu Fonts
Font Squirrel

4. Droid Sans Mono

Part of the Droid font family, and commissioned by Google, this monospaced member promises "excellent legibility characteristics in its letterforms," according to its official description. This font functions well in code editors, but also looks good when rendered in user interfaces. Droid Sans Mono is also by Steve Matteson.

Droid Sans Mono resources
Official site Droid Sans Mono
Useful resources Droid Sans Mono great coding font (DamienG)
Font sample Droid Sans Mono (Wikipedia)
Repo GitHub
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

5. Fira Mono

The Fira font family, designed by Erik Spiekermann, was commissioned by Mozilla for their OS. This monospaced variant has excellent punctuation-mark legibility for me.

Fira Mono resources
Official site Fira Sans on the designer’s website
Useful resources Mozilla Style Guide: Firefox OS Typeface (Mozilla)
Fira specimen page (Mozilla/Github.io)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Carrois
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

6. Hermit

Hermit is "a font for programmers, by a programmer." This font is a relatively new font. It’s by Pablo Caro, whose professional background as an engineer and computer scientist, and track record of projects, make him an individual not only qualified to know what the needs of programmers are, but also an interestingly atypical designer of fonts. This monospaced font is "designed to be clear, pragmatic and very readable," according to Caro’s website. "Its creation has been focused on programming."

Hermit resources
Official site Hermit
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Pablo Caro
GitHub

7. Inconsolata

Inconsolata draws inspiration from the ubiquitous Consolas font by Microsoft. Inconsolata was developed by Raph Levien, a Google engineer currently assigned to the Android platform. Levien says on his site that though there are many great programming fonts, many of them "do not have the attention to detail for high resolution rendering."

Inconsolata resources
Official site Inconsolata
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Levien.com
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

8. Oxygen Mono

This monospaced font family is by Vernon Adams, a person who’s well-known in the open source font community. Oxygen Mono works well on the desktop. The font’s characters — and particularly, for me, its punctionation marks — have great definition and legibility.

Oxygen Mono resources
More info Oxygen Mono (Google Fonts)
Useful resources Very first drafts of ‘Oxygen Monospace’ (NewTypography)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

9. PT Mono

The PT font family was designed for the Russian language, but works equally well with the Latin alphabet. The PT Mono variation is by Alexandra Korolkova. The font’s very readable, as well as very elegant with its Humanist characteristics.

PT Mono resources
Official site ParaType Public Types Project
License SIL Open Font License
Download links ParaType
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

10. Source Code Pro

Last but certainly not the least, because it’s the programming font I’m currently using, is Source Code Pro created by Paul D. Hunt. This font is one of Adobe’s open source projects. Source Code Pro is comfortable to read and write code with.

Source Code Pro resources
Official site Source Code Pro
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

References

  1. Monospaced font (wikipedia.org)
  2. The Aesthetics of Reading (PDF) (mit.edu)
  3. Google Fonts Cousine (google.com)

Related Content

About the Author

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end web developer by profession. If you’d like to connect with him, head on over to the contact page or follow him on Twitter: @sixrevisions.

The post Top 10 Free Programming Fonts appeared first on Six Revisions.

When your profession involves writing code for significantly long periods of time, even deceptively trivial things such the font you’re using can make a huge difference.

This is a list of fonts for people who love code.

For your convenience, I have created a sample page for all the fonts mentioned here, which may help you choose the one that’s right for you.

Programming Fonts Sample Page

View source on GitHub

Selection Criteria

Here are the factors used for choosing the fonts in this list.

Monospaced

A good font that’s used for programming should be monospaced, meaning each character occupies the same amount of horizontal space1. Monospaced fonts are also called fixed-width fonts.

Using a fixed-width font is essential for formatting and readability of source code.

Screen readability and legibility

When you have to stare at code for hours, reading comfort is really important.

In addition, research shows that fonts can affect the user experience; typography has measurable cognitive effects on our mood2, which, in turn, could have indirect implications towards our productivity.

Preferably, the font we choose is explicitly designed with coding in mind, and is optimized especially for on-screen/computer-monitor readability.

Readability is a subjective matter — what’s easy for me to read, might not be so for you. The programming fonts sample page can be used as a rudimentary tool for evaluating the readability and legibility of each font in this list.

Unambiguous characters

To avoid syntax errors, we should be able to effortlessly distinguish between similar characters such as l, 1, | and I when we’re writing/reading code. Programmers shouldn’t have to wonder whether they typed 0, O or o, or whether a string value is wrapped with backticks (``) or apostrophes ('').

The sample page has a code block that contains potentially ambiguous characters so that you are able to test a particular font’s legibility.

Truly free

The best programming fonts are free and open-sourced in my opinion. And, particularly for those of us who are web developers, we’d like to not have to worry about whether or not we can render the font in the browser as part of a UI design.

My intention with this list is to highlight free fonts that are truly free. Some popular programming fonts — fonts that I also personally love, such as Consolas and Monaco — were intentionally left out because their licensing terms outside of personal use were unclear.

Reputation

A great deal of time was spent hunting down and researching the fonts for inclusion in this list. This activity led me to fonts that are well-loved by the programming community and helped me narrow this roundup down to a manageable size.

Personal preference

There’s always going to be some level of bias when pulling together a list like this.

There are many excellent programming fonts out there that match the criteria above, but at the end of the day this list has a major flaw and limiting factor: Me. I chose to include only the programming fonts I’m comfortable recommending to others. If you have recommendations, please share them in the comments section of this article.

The Fonts

You’ll find a table listing relevant resources and information for each font. Also, each font has multiple download links pointing to trustworthy domains in case a link stops working in the future.

Here are the ten free programming fonts.

1. Anonymous Pro

Anonymous Pro, by typeface designer Mark Simonson, was "designed especially for coders," according to its website. This font has keyboard characters like the Command key found on Apple keyboards, making it a good candidate font for displaying keyboard shortcuts on web pages and user interfaces.

Anonymous Pro resources
Official site Anonymous Pro
Useful resources Anonymous Pro specimen (PDF) (Mark Simonson)
Anonymous Pro: a programming font with style (Hivelogic)
Sites using Anonymous Pro (Typewolf)
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Mark Simonson
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

2. Cousine

If you’re a fan of the Courier font family, then you’re going to like Cousine. Cousine improves on the font family that inspired it by offering "improved on-screen readability characteristics"3. This font was made by Steve Matteson, the designer of many of the fonts you see in open source operating systems.

Cousine resources
More info Cousine (Open Font Library)
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

3. DejaVu Sans Mono

This monospaced font is a member of the DejaVu font family, an open source project. The font’s characters are markedly more robust compared to others in the same class.

DejaVu Sans Mono resources
Official site DejaVu Fonts
Useful resources DejaVu font specimen (PDF) (DejaVu Fonts)
Repo SourceForge.net
License Free license (custom)
Download links DejaVu Fonts
Font Squirrel

4. Droid Sans Mono

Part of the Droid font family, and commissioned by Google, this monospaced member promises "excellent legibility characteristics in its letterforms," according to its official description. This font functions well in code editors, but also looks good when rendered in user interfaces. Droid Sans Mono is also by Steve Matteson.

Droid Sans Mono resources
Official site Droid Sans Mono
Useful resources Droid Sans Mono great coding font (DamienG)
Font sample Droid Sans Mono (Wikipedia)
Repo GitHub
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

5. Fira Mono

The Fira font family, designed by Erik Spiekermann, was commissioned by Mozilla for their OS. This monospaced variant has excellent punctuation-mark legibility for me.

Fira Mono resources
Official site Fira Sans on the designer’s website
Useful resources Mozilla Style Guide: Firefox OS Typeface (Mozilla)
Fira specimen page (Mozilla/Github.io)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Carrois
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

6. Hermit

Hermit is "a font for programmers, by a programmer." This font is a relatively new font. It’s by Pablo Caro, whose professional background as an engineer and computer scientist, and track record of projects, make him an individual not only qualified to know what the needs of programmers are, but also an interestingly atypical designer of fonts. This monospaced font is "designed to be clear, pragmatic and very readable," according to Caro’s website. "Its creation has been focused on programming."

Hermit resources
Official site Hermit
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Pablo Caro
GitHub

7. Inconsolata

Inconsolata draws inspiration from the ubiquitous Consolas font by Microsoft. Inconsolata was developed by Raph Levien, a Google engineer currently assigned to the Android platform. Levien says on his site that though there are many great programming fonts, many of them "do not have the attention to detail for high resolution rendering."

Inconsolata resources
Official site Inconsolata
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Levien.com
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

8. Oxygen Mono

This monospaced font family is by Vernon Adams, a person who’s well-known in the open source font community. Oxygen Mono works well on the desktop. The font’s characters — and particularly, for me, its punctionation marks — have great definition and legibility.

Oxygen Mono resources
More info Oxygen Mono (Google Fonts)
Useful resources Very first drafts of ‘Oxygen Monospace’ (NewTypography)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

9. PT Mono

The PT font family was designed for the Russian language, but works equally well with the Latin alphabet. The PT Mono variation is by Alexandra Korolkova. The font’s very readable, as well as very elegant with its Humanist characteristics.

PT Mono resources
Official site ParaType Public Types Project
License SIL Open Font License
Download links ParaType
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

10. Source Code Pro

Last but certainly not the least, because it’s the programming font I’m currently using, is Source Code Pro created by Paul D. Hunt. This font is one of Adobe’s open source projects. Source Code Pro is comfortable to read and write code with.

Source Code Pro resources
Official site Source Code Pro
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

References

  1. Monospaced font (wikipedia.org)
  2. The Aesthetics of Reading (PDF) (mit.edu)
  3. Google Fonts Cousine (google.com)

Related Content

About the Author

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end web developer by profession. If you’d like to connect with him, head on over to the contact page or follow him on Twitter: @sixrevisions.

The post Top 10 Free Programming Fonts appeared first on Six Revisions.

When your profession involves writing code for significantly long periods of time, even deceptively trivial things such the font you’re using can make a huge difference.

This is a list of fonts for people who love code.

For your convenience, I have created a sample page for all the fonts mentioned here, which may help you choose the one that’s right for you.

Programming Fonts Sample Page

View source on GitHub

Selection Criteria

Here are the factors used for choosing the fonts in this list.

Monospaced

A good font that’s used for programming should be monospaced, meaning each character occupies the same amount of horizontal space1. Monospaced fonts are also called fixed-width fonts.

Using a fixed-width font is essential for formatting and readability of source code.

Screen readability and legibility

When you have to stare at code for hours, reading comfort is really important.

In addition, research shows that fonts can affect the user experience; typography has measurable cognitive effects on our mood2, which, in turn, could have indirect implications towards our productivity.

Preferably, the font we choose is explicitly designed with coding in mind, and is optimized especially for on-screen/computer-monitor readability.

Readability is a subjective matter — what’s easy for me to read, might not be so for you. The programming fonts sample page can be used as a rudimentary tool for evaluating the readability and legibility of each font in this list.

Unambiguous characters

To avoid syntax errors, we should be able to effortlessly distinguish between similar characters such as l, 1, | and I when we’re writing/reading code. Programmers shouldn’t have to wonder whether they typed 0, O or o, or whether a string value is wrapped with backticks (``) or apostrophes ('').

The sample page has a code block that contains potentially ambiguous characters so that you are able to test a particular font’s legibility.

Truly free

The best programming fonts are free and open-sourced in my opinion. And, particularly for those of us who are web developers, we’d like to not have to worry about whether or not we can render the font in the browser as part of a UI design.

My intention with this list is to highlight free fonts that are truly free. Some popular programming fonts — fonts that I also personally love, such as Consolas and Monaco — were intentionally left out because their licensing terms outside of personal use were unclear.

Reputation

A great deal of time was spent hunting down and researching the fonts for inclusion in this list. This activity led me to fonts that are well-loved by the programming community and helped me narrow this roundup down to a manageable size.

Personal preference

There’s always going to be some level of bias when pulling together a list like this.

There are many excellent programming fonts out there that match the criteria above, but at the end of the day this list has a major flaw and limiting factor: Me. I chose to include only the programming fonts I’m comfortable recommending to others. If you have recommendations, please share them in the comments section of this article.

The Fonts

You’ll find a table listing relevant resources and information for each font. Also, each font has multiple download links pointing to trustworthy domains in case a link stops working in the future.

Here are the ten free programming fonts.

1. Anonymous Pro

Anonymous Pro, by typeface designer Mark Simonson, was "designed especially for coders," according to its website. This font has keyboard characters like the Command key found on Apple keyboards, making it a good candidate font for displaying keyboard shortcuts on web pages and user interfaces.

Anonymous Pro resources
Official site Anonymous Pro
Useful resources Anonymous Pro specimen (PDF) (Mark Simonson)
Anonymous Pro: a programming font with style (Hivelogic)
Sites using Anonymous Pro (Typewolf)
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Mark Simonson
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

2. Cousine

If you’re a fan of the Courier font family, then you’re going to like Cousine. Cousine improves on the font family that inspired it by offering "improved on-screen readability characteristics"3. This font was made by Steve Matteson, the designer of many of the fonts you see in open source operating systems.

Cousine resources
More info Cousine (Open Font Library)
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

3. DejaVu Sans Mono

This monospaced font is a member of the DejaVu font family, an open source project. The font’s characters are markedly more robust compared to others in the same class.

DejaVu Sans Mono resources
Official site DejaVu Fonts
Useful resources DejaVu font specimen (PDF) (DejaVu Fonts)
Repo SourceForge.net
License Free license (custom)
Download links DejaVu Fonts
Font Squirrel

4. Droid Sans Mono

Part of the Droid font family, and commissioned by Google, this monospaced member promises "excellent legibility characteristics in its letterforms," according to its official description. This font functions well in code editors, but also looks good when rendered in user interfaces. Droid Sans Mono is also by Steve Matteson.

Droid Sans Mono resources
Official site Droid Sans Mono
Useful resources Droid Sans Mono great coding font (DamienG)
Font sample Droid Sans Mono (Wikipedia)
Repo GitHub
License Apache License version 2.0
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

5. Fira Mono

The Fira font family, designed by Erik Spiekermann, was commissioned by Mozilla for their OS. This monospaced variant has excellent punctuation-mark legibility for me.

Fira Mono resources
Official site Fira Sans on the designer’s website
Useful resources Mozilla Style Guide: Firefox OS Typeface (Mozilla)
Fira specimen page (Mozilla/Github.io)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Carrois
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

6. Hermit

Hermit is "a font for programmers, by a programmer." This font is a relatively new font. It’s by Pablo Caro, whose professional background as an engineer and computer scientist, and track record of projects, make him an individual not only qualified to know what the needs of programmers are, but also an interestingly atypical designer of fonts. This monospaced font is "designed to be clear, pragmatic and very readable," according to Caro’s website. "Its creation has been focused on programming."

Hermit resources
Official site Hermit
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Pablo Caro
GitHub

7. Inconsolata

Inconsolata draws inspiration from the ubiquitous Consolas font by Microsoft. Inconsolata was developed by Raph Levien, a Google engineer currently assigned to the Android platform. Levien says on his site that though there are many great programming fonts, many of them "do not have the attention to detail for high resolution rendering."

Inconsolata resources
Official site Inconsolata
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Levien.com
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

8. Oxygen Mono

This monospaced font family is by Vernon Adams, a person who’s well-known in the open source font community. Oxygen Mono works well on the desktop. The font’s characters — and particularly, for me, its punctionation marks — have great definition and legibility.

Oxygen Mono resources
More info Oxygen Mono (Google Fonts)
Useful resources Very first drafts of ‘Oxygen Monospace’ (NewTypography)
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

9. PT Mono

The PT font family was designed for the Russian language, but works equally well with the Latin alphabet. The PT Mono variation is by Alexandra Korolkova. The font’s very readable, as well as very elegant with its Humanist characteristics.

PT Mono resources
Official site ParaType Public Types Project
License SIL Open Font License
Download links ParaType
Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

10. Source Code Pro

Last but certainly not the least, because it’s the programming font I’m currently using, is Source Code Pro created by Paul D. Hunt. This font is one of Adobe’s open source projects. Source Code Pro is comfortable to read and write code with.

Source Code Pro resources
Official site Source Code Pro
Repo GitHub
License SIL Open Font License
Download links Font Squirrel
Google Fonts

References

  1. Monospaced font (wikipedia.org)
  2. The Aesthetics of Reading (PDF) (mit.edu)
  3. Google Fonts Cousine (google.com)

Related Content

About the Author

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end web developer by profession. If you’d like to connect with him, head on over to the contact page or follow him on Twitter: @sixrevisions.

The post Top 10 Free Programming Fonts appeared first on Six Revisions.

Nowadays, you’ll have a hard time finding a professional developer who doesn’t use a version control system (VCS) such as Git.

But, there are still a few among us who choose not to use a VCS due to preconceived notions they might have about version control.

Here are some myths and excuses that dissuade developers from integrating Git — and any version control system in general — into their workflow.

Myth 1: I don’t need Git because I back up my files

Creating regular backups of your work is definitely a good habit. Consider keeping this habit even when using Git.

But Git provides you a lot more benefits compared to just a system of backing up your files.

Without a VCS, you’ll run into a several of issues.

How do you name your backups? If you’re a very organized person, you might be able to stick to an actually comprehendible naming scheme like acme-inc-redesign_2013-11-12_v23.html. However, any deviance from the file-naming convention quickly leads to confusion and, quite possibly, issues with your code.

Let a system like Git worry about the minutia so that you can focus on what you do best: Writing code.

How much of your work are you saving? Only the changed files or the complete project? In the case of the former, it will be tough to see a full picture of a version/variant of your project at any given time. In the case of the latter, where you are backing up the entire codebase at regular intervals, you’ll have huge amounts of redundant files lying around on your hard drive, and more files mean more complications.

The most important issue that can be solved with Git is probably this one:

How do you know what’s different in these backups? Very few people actually take the time to carefully document each and every change they make. On the other hand, Git acknowledges that there is only one project. Everything else — all the past versions and variants — are neatly tucked away in the back-end of the version control system, ready for you whenever you need it. And when you do need it, you can request any version at any time and you’ll have a snapshot of the complete project right at hand.

In addition, you can determine with great precision what has changed in each file. You can tell which lines have been added, which lines have been removed, and which ones have been modified — which means that bug-tracing, emergency rollbacks to stable versions of the project and partial-version rollbacks are much easier processes.

Myth 2: Git is too complicated. It’s not worth the hassle.

People often overestimate how deeply they need to dive into Git to get its main benefits.

It’s true that you can spend a whole lot of time trying to wrap your head around all the fanciest, edge-case Git commands — Git is indeed an extremely powerful and flexible system.

But, it’s also true that you can work productively and reap Git’s major perks with just a handful of commands.

Yes, learning a new skill means more additional work — no one can spare you from that — but the benefits you’ll gain when you start using Git vastly outweighs the time and effort required to learn it.

Learning Git will improve your projects’ quality, as well as your efficiency and productivity as a developer. Also, you will be able to collaborate with other developers in a more systematic and reliable way, delivering even more development-productivity improvements to you and your team.

Myth 3: Git is only for development teams

Distributed version control systems like Git or Mercurial allow you to work completely on your local computer. Should you have projects where you don’t collaborate with anyone else, it’s perfectly valid to perform all tasks on your machine. Git provides as much benefit to the solo developer as it does to dev teams.

You don’t need a remote server or code-hosting service to use Git and to reap its usefulness.

But, it’s worth pointing out that using a remote code-hosting service like GitHub makes sense even as a solo developer, so that you can have external backups of your code in case your computer breaks down or gets lost, or to sync your projects safely across multiple computers (perhaps you have a work laptop and a personal computer at home that you use to develop code with). However, this isn’t necessarily something you need to do; it’s only an optional advantage.

The benefits that Git brings you remain the same, no matter if you’re working in a team or on your own.

Myth 4: The command-line interface is too complicated

You don’t need to be a command-line interface (CLI) expert to use Git. In fact, a handful of commands is all most developers will ever need.

You can learn Git’s important commands in less than an afternoon: We created a guide called Command Line 101 that you can read to learn about the CLI as it pertains to Git — it’s part of our free online book called Learn Version Control with Git: A step-by-step course for the complete beginner.

But let’s just say a handful of basic commands is still too much contact with the CLI for you. Or maybe you made a strange, unbreakable blood pact with a friend never to use the command-line interface ever again, or, for some reason, you simply cannot use a CLI. You can still use Git through an application that has a graphical user interface (GUI). If you’re on Windows, I recommend you take a look at Tortoise Git. On Mac OS, you should give Tower — an app that my company, fournova, has developed — a look-see.

Even for users that are comfortable with the command line, a GUI could still improve productivity by making complex Git tasks easier.

Myth 5: I’m afraid I’ll break something

It should be the other way around: You should be afraid to break things if you don’t use a version control system because it’s hard to retrace your steps and your code-base changes without one.

Version control is our safety net. When things catastrophically break down, we can easily roll back to a previous version that’s stable.

Using Git, you will be able to:

  • undo your local changes (partially or completely)
  • restore any historic version in case something goes wrong
  • revert the effect of any change you made in the past

And I would also like to point out what is in my opinion Git’s most important feature: branches.

Branches provide us with a secure ecosystem for trying out new features, completely separated from other parts of our development project. This encourages us to experiment with new code and to see and test the effects of any code changes while giving us the confidence that we won’t be affecting anything outside of the current branch.

Myth 6: Git is all hype. It’s just a popular trend that will later fade away.

First, Git is definitely not the one and only version control system out there. There are many other great VCS options to consider, each one with its own unique merits.

But it’s not simply by chance that major projects such as jQuery, Rails and the Linux Kernel, just to name a few, rely on Git for version control and code-collaboration.

For coding projects, Git is currently one of the best systems out there. Here are several reasons why Git is a great choice.

Feature Set

Of course, Git’s feature set and philosophy are its biggest value propositions to its users: A great branching model, offline capability, and its "staging area" concept are just some of the prime features that help with the productivity, creativity and efficiency of developers.

Popularity and Staying Power

Being popular and widely available is important for any system. Popularity means there’s a community out there ready to help you get started with the system.

And when you find yourself coding collaboratively, there’s a greater chance your teammates will already know how to use Git.

In addition, being a popular VCS also makes Git attractive for third parties to develop and provide supporting tools and services (e.g. GitHub) that could further enhance your experience with Git.

Popularity also ensures that the Git open source project won’t disappear any time soon — which is an important factor for developers thinking about committing to an open source project for the long-haul.

Official Git website home page (2014).Official Git website home page (2014)

Availability of Quality Educational Materials

It has never been easier to start learning Git. Today, there are tons of documentation, tutorials, videos and how-tos available about the VCS.

Here are a few resources to help you get started with Git.

Why Aren’t You Using Git Yet?

Now over to you: What’s holding you back from using version control with Git? Let us know in the comments!

Related Content

About the Author

Tobias Günther is CEO and founder of fournova. In 2010, he set out to make Git easier to use: Together with his team, he develops the Git desktop client, Tower for Mac.

The post 6 Myths Preventing Developers from Using Git appeared first on Six Revisions.

Several years ago, researchers at MIT confirmed through a study that fonts can impact how we feel: A bad font can make us frown unconsciously, while a good font can make us feel happy.

If fonts can influence our emotions, then they can certainly impact the user experience.

A few weeks ago, I decided to find out how much of an impact fonts have on UX.

Through a series of split test experiments, I managed to improve my site’s engagement by 38%. I did this by changing nothing but the font styling of the site.

Before I go into the details of my experiment, I want to first explain why fonts can have a surprisingly large power over how our users interpret our content.

How fonts impact our emotions

Fonts affect our emotions in two ways.

Cognitive bias

Firstly, we associate certain connotations to specific fonts and font styles. This, like many other things in our world, is often influenced by our cognitive biases and the culture we grow up in. For instance, sans serif fonts are commonly used on official U.S. government forms. But, in England, sans serif fonts are more commonly used by tabloids.

The context in which different fonts are used changes how we feel when we see them.

Take a look at the two screenshots below from my company’s blog, featuring a guide on building a WordPress site, set using two very different fonts.

Notice how the same content can convey a vastly different message depending on the font you use to present it.

Version 1: The site’s normal fonts

Version 2: Comic Sans font

The second version comes across as far less trustworthy and professional. This is not due to the curvature and spacing of the letters or any other typographic characteristic of the font. It’s due to the fact we’ve learned to associate comic sans with childishness.

Objective readability

On top of all that, some fonts are inherently easier to read than others. And the harder our eyes and brains have to work to interpret a piece of text, the worse we report feeling afterwards.

Serif fonts were originally used by the print press, as serifs are proven to help the eye move from letter to letter faster.

When computers were first used, computer screens had low resolutions. Serif fonts had to be created using vectors, which just didn’t look right with the low pixel-density available back in the days. So, early designers defaulted to using sans serif fonts, which were created as bitmaps.

Screen resolutions have come along way over the past few decades. We’re at a point where pixels are barely recognizable up close. As such, serif fonts liked Georgia are becoming more and more popular.

Experimenting with fonts

When experimenting with fonts, the first question I wanted to answer was, of course, which font is best for our website?

I ran an initial split test on one of our articles where I tested three different fonts: Georgia, Arial, and Verdana.

We measured the performance of each font by the number of clicks on the article, in combination with behavioral metrics like bounce rate and time-on-page.

Here are text-block snippets of the fonts we tested so that you may get a visual idea about the variants we tested.

Georgia

Georgia font being tested for UX.

Arial

Arial font being tested for UX.

Verdana

Verdana font being tested for UX.

I anticipated that Georgia would win (because of objective readability) and Verdana would lose.

While I was right in guessing that Georgia would be the winner, I was wrong about Verdana. In fact, the variation using Verdana generated 29.1% more clicks than our original font (Arial).

We also noticed that the variation using Georgia had a much better average time-on-page, indicating that our users were reading more of the article. This was also confirmed using heat maps.

Experimenting on font size

After confirming that Georgia was the best performing font for our site, I wanted to know what size the font should be to provide the best readability and engagement possible.

Reasonably, I expected the larger the font, the more readable it would be.

Wrong again.

First I tested 14px vs. 15px vs. 16px.

Using the same methods outlined above, it turned out that 14px generated the highest level of engagement.

Note: I also increased the line height by one pixel for every pixel increase in font size.

This was surprising, as I’d previously read studies such as this one on how larger fonts can increase the amount of attention a reader gives to the text she’s reading.  And, anecdotally, many websites that are considered highly readable are using fonts over 20px in size.

To double-check the accuracy of my results, I ran an identical experiment testing 10px, 14px, 18px and 21px.

Again, 14px won.

To me, this only suggests what every experienced A/B tester will tell you: What works for one person may not work for someone else. For our blog’s design, and the font we’re using, and perhaps even for the content we post, 14px seems to be the sweet spot.

How changing our font affected user experience

So, what impact did all of this work have on our website’s user experience?

After rolling out the 14px Georgia font across the whole website, we noticed that our website’s average bounce rate decreased from 88.0% to 80.9% — a 7.1% improvement.

Our average pages viewed per session also increased from 1.21 to 1.43, an 18.18% improvement, and our average time-on-site improved by about 10 seconds.

As with all things related to split testing, don’t take my word for it. Use a split testing tool like VWO or Optimizely to work out which font resonates best with your readers, and which one generates the most engagement for you.

Related Content

About the Author

Marcus Taylor is the founder and CEO of Venture Harbour, a digital marketing studio that develops and grows a portfolio of online businesses.

The post How Fonts Affect the User Experience appeared first on Six Revisions.

“No shows” stink. A few startups recently complained to the author that after diligently planning UX studies and recruiting a great batch of customers, some of their participants just didn’t show up. That’s incredibly frustrating, can be embarrassing in front of the team, and wastes everyone’s time.

Here are a few habits that have dramatically reduced “no shows” at the author’s studies:

  1. Avoid scheduling interviews on Mondays or immediately before or after holidays
  2. Offer an incentive that’s big enough to motivate people to show up
  3. Don’t start recruiting too far in advance
  4. Send recruits clearly written confirmation emails
  5. If parking is difficult in your neighborhood, give them specific instructions and assistance
  6. Ensure all communication (phone calls, emails, etc.) to your participants is respectful, professional, and organized
  7. Warn recruits ahead of time that the sessions will be 1-on-1 interviews
  8. Call participants to remind them about their appointments the day before
  9. Elicit several responses from your recruits in the days leading up to the study

No More “No Shows” — How to Make Sure Your Research Participants Actually Show Up

“No shows” stink. A few startups recently complained to the author that after diligently planning UX studies and recruiting a great batch of customers, some of their participants just didn’t show up. That’s incredibly frustrating, can be embarrassing in front of the team, and wastes everyone’s time.

Here are a few habits that have dramatically reduced “no shows” at the author’s studies:

  1. Avoid scheduling interviews on Mondays or immediately before or after holidays
  2. Offer an incentive that’s big enough to motivate people to show up
  3. Don’t start recruiting too far in advance
  4. Send recruits clearly written confirmation emails
  5. If parking is difficult in your neighborhood, give them specific instructions and assistance
  6. Ensure all communication (phone calls, emails, etc.) to your participants is respectful, professional, and organized
  7. Warn recruits ahead of time that the sessions will be 1-on-1 interviews
  8. Call participants to remind them about their appointments the day before
  9. Elicit several responses from your recruits in the days leading up to the study

No More “No Shows” — How to Make Sure Your Research Participants Actually Show Up

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