This wiki collects information about tools and resources that can help scholars (particularly in the humanities and social sciences) conduct research more efficiently or creatively.  Whether you need software to help you manage citations, author a multimedia work, or analyze texts, Digital Research Tools will help you find what you’re looking for. They provide a directory of tools organized by research activity, as well as reviews of select tools in which we not only describe the tool’s features, but also explore how it might be employed most effectively by researchers.

Digital Research Tools

 

The post Digital Research Tools appeared first on The UX Bookmark.

Transferring files to and from your web host or server is best done with what’s commonly known an FTP client, though the term is a bit dated because there are more secure alternatives such as SFTP and FTPS.

When I was putting together this list, this was my criteria:

  • Supports secure file transfer protocols: FTP isn’t secure. Among its many flaws, plain FTP doesn’t encrypt the data you’re transferring. If your data is compromised en route to its destination, your credentials (username and password) and your data can easily be read. SFTP (which stands for SHH File Transfer Protocol) is a popular secure alternative, but there are many others.
  • Has a GUI: There are some awesome FTP clients with a command-line interface, but for a great number of people, a graphical user interface is more approachable and easier to use.

1. FileZilla

Topping the list is FileZilla, an open source FTP client. It’s fast, being able to handle simultaneous transmissions (multi-threaded transfers), and supports SFTP and FTPS (which stands for FTP over SSL). What’s more, it’s available on all operating systems, so if you work on multiple computers — like if you’re forced to use Windows at work but you have a Mac at home — you don’t need to use a different application for your file-transferring needs.

FileZilla

Available on Windows, Mac OS and Linux

Download here

2. Cyberduck

Cyberduck can take care of a ton of your file-transferring needs: SFTP, WebDav, Amazon S3, and more. It has a minimalist UI, which makes it super easy to use.

Cyberduck

Available on Windows and Mac OS

Download here

3. FireFTP

This Mozilla Firefox add-on gives you a very capable FTP/SFTP client right within your browser. It’s available on all platforms that can run Firefox.

FireFTP

Available on Windows, Mac OS and Linux

Download here

4. Classic FTP

Classic FTP is a file transfer client that’s free for non-commercial use. It has a very simple interface, which is a good thing, because it makes it easy and intuitive to use. I like its "Compare Directories" feature that’s helpful for seeing differences between your local and remote files.

Classic FTP

Available on Windows and Mac OS

Download Here

5. WinSCP

This popular FTP client has a very long list of features, and if you’re a Windows user, it’s certainly worth a look. WinSCP can deal with multiple file-transfer protocols (SFTP, SCP, FTP, and WebDav). It has a built-in text editor for making quick text edits more convenient, and has scripting support for power users.

WinSCP

Available on Windows

Download here

Honorable Mention: Transmit

For this post, I decided to focus on free software. But it just doesn’t seem right to leave out Transmit (which costs $34) in a post about FTP clients because it’s a popular option used by web developers on Mac OS. It has a lot of innovative features and its user-friendliness is unmatched. If you’ve got the cash to spare and you’re on a Mac, this might be your best option.

TransmitSource: panic.com

Available on Mac OS

Download Here

Which FTP client do you use?

There’s a great deal of FTP clients out there. If your favorite FTP client isn’t on the list, please mention it in the comments for the benefit of other readers. And if you’ve used any of the FTP clients mentioned here, please do share your thoughts about them too.

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end developer. Connect with him on Twitter and Facebook.

Related Content

10 Free Server Monitoring Tools

5 Games That Teach You How to Code

A New Breed of Free Source Code Editors

The post The 5 Best Free FTP Clients appeared first on Six Revisions.

This hands-on resource is a project guide that focuses on content strategy in UX design and is explained through through an imaginary website project.

This guide shows how to embed content-first thinking into popular UX design techniques to reveal useful insights about the content, that lead to a better user experience.

UX Design And Content Strategy: The Project Guide

The post UX Design And Content Strategy: The Project Guide appeared first on The UX Bookmark.

This hands-on resource is a project guide that focuses on content strategy in UX design and is explained through through an imaginary website project.

This guide shows how to embed content-first thinking into popular UX design techniques to reveal useful insights about the content, that lead to a better user experience.

UX Design And Content Strategy: The Project Guide

The post UX Design And Content Strategy: The Project Guide appeared first on The UX Bookmark.


GoodUI has started sketching on Instagram. The sketches, although experimental, are still very much conversion focused. Every now and then I decided to get back to basics with a pencil, pens, paper and markers. Oh and the better sketches will eventually make it back into the GoodUI Fastforward template set. Enjoy.

Follow GoodUI On Instagram

Credits: Jakub Linowski


GoodUI has started sketching on Instagram. The sketches, although experimental, are still very much conversion focused. Every now and then I decided to get back to basics with a pencil, pens, paper and markers. Oh and the better sketches will eventually make it back into the GoodUI Fastforward template set. Enjoy.

Follow GoodUI On Instagram

Credits: Jakub Linowski

Brackets is a great source code editor for web designers and front-end web developers. It has a ton of useful features out of the box. You can make your Brackets experience even better by using extensions.

These Brackets extensions will help make your web design and front-end web development workflow a little easier.

1. CanIUse

Quickly see the current level of browser support a certain web technology has without leaving Brackets. This extension sources its data from Can I use.

CanIUse

2. HTML Skeleton

HTML Skeleton helps you set up your HTML files quickly by automatically inserting basic markup such as the doctype declaration, <html>, <head>, <body>, etc.

HTML Skeleton

Related: A Generic HTML5 Template

3. HTML Wrapper

Rapidly mark up a list of text into list items (<li>), table rows (<tr>), hyperlinks, (<a>), and more with HTML Wrapper.

HTML Wrapper

4. Brackets Icons

This is a super simple extension that adds file icons in Brackets’s sidebar. The icons are excellent visual cues that make it much easier to identify the file you’d like to work on.

Brackets Icons

5. Autoprefixer

Automatically and intelligently add vendor prefixes to your CSS properties with the Autoprefixer extension. It uses browser support data from Can I use to decide whether or not a vendor prefix is needed. It’ll also remove unnecessary vendor prefixes.

Autoprefixer

6. JS CSS Minifier

This extension will remove unneeded characters from your JavaScript and CSS files. This process is called minification, and it can improve your website’s speed.

JS CSS Minifier

7. CSSLint

This extension highlights CSS errors and code-quality issues. The errors and warnings reported by this extension are based on CSS Lint rules.

CSSLint

8. Emmet

Emmet is a collection of tools and keyboard shortcuts that can speed up HTML- and CSS-authoring.

Emmet

9. Lorem Ipsum Generator

Need some text to fill up your design prototype? The Lorem Ipsum Generator extension helps you conveniently generate dummy text. (And if you need image placeholders, have a look at Lorem Pixel or DEVimg.)

Lorem Ipsum Generator

10. Beautify

This extension will help keep your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code consistently formatted, indented, and — most importantly — readable. An alternative option to check out is the CSSComb extension.

Beautify

11. Simple To-Do

Make sure you don’t forget your project tasks by using the Simple To-Do extension, which allows you to create and manage to-do lists for each project within Brackets.

Simple To-Do

12. eqFTP

Transferring and syncing your project’s files to your web host or server requires FTP or SFTP, but such a fundamental web development feature doesn’t come with Brackets. To remedy the situation, use the eqFTP extension, an FTP/STFP client that you can operate from within Brackets.

eqFTP

How to Install Brackets Extensions

The quickest way to install Brackets extensions is by using the Extension Manager — access it by choosing File > Extension Manager in Brackets’s toolbar.

Brackets Extension Manager

If I didn’t mention your favorite Brackets extension, please talk about it in the comments.

Jacob Gube is the founder of Six Revisions. He’s a front-end developer. Connect with him on Twitter and Facebook.

Related

A New Breed of Free Source Code Editors

10 Open Source Blogging Platforms for Developers

15 Free Books for People Who Code

Should Web Designers Know HTML and CSS?

5 Games That Teach You How to Code

The post 12 Brackets Extensions That Will Make Your Life Easier appeared first on Six Revisions.

The best designers are lifelong students. While nothing beats experience in the field, the amount of helpful online resources certainly helps keep our knowledge sharp.

In this post, I’ve rounded up some useful e-books that provide excellent UX advice and insights.

1. Bright Ideas for User Experience Designers

This is a free e-book by usability consultancy firm Userfocus. The best part of this book is its casual tone. Acronyms like "the CRAP way to usability" and The Beatles analogies make remembering the book’s lessons a lot easier, and makes for an interesting read. That’s why this book is one of my favorites.

2. 50 User Experience Best Practices

50 User Experience Best Practices

As the book’s title implies, 50 User Experience Best Practices delivers UX tips and best practices. It delves into subjects such as user research and content strategy. One of the secrets to this book’s success is its creative and easy-to-comprehend visuals. This e-book was written and published by the now-defunct UX design agency, Above the Fold.

3. UX Design Trends Bundle

UX Design Trends Bundle

Over at UXPin, my team and I have written and published a lot of free e-books. For this post, I’d like to specifically highlight our UX Design Trends Bundle. It’s a compilation of three of our e-books: Web Design Trends 2016, UX Design Trends 2015 & 2016, and Mobile UI Design Trends 2015 & 2016. Totaling 350+ pages, this bundle examines over 300 excellent designs.

4. UX Storytellers: Connecting the Dots

UX Storytellers: Connecting the Dots

Published in 2009, UX Storytellers: Connecting the Dots, continues to be a very insightful read. This classic e-book stays relevant because of its unique format: It collects stand-alone stories and advice from 42 UX professionals. At 586 pages, there’s a ton of content in this book. Download it now to learn about the struggles — and solutions — UX professionals can expect to face.

5. The UX Reader

The UX Reader

This e-book covers all the important components of the UX design process. It’s full of valuable insights, making it appealing to both beginners and veterans alike. The book is divided into five categories: Collaboration, Research, Design, Development, and Refinement. Each category contains a series of articles written by different members of MailChimp’s UX team.

6. Learn from Great Design

Learn from Great Design

Only a portion of this book, 57 pages, is free.

In this e-book, web designer Tom Kenny does in-depth analyses of great web designs, pointing out what they’re doing right, and also what they could do better. For those that learn best by looking at real-world examples, this book is a great read.

The full version of this e-book contains 20 case studies; the free sample only has 3 of those case studies.

7. The Practical Interaction Design Bundle

The Practical Interaction Design Bundle

I’ll end this list with another UXPin selection. This bundle contains three of our IxD e-books: Interaction Design Best Practices Volume 1 and Volume 2, as well as Consistency in UI Design.

  • Interaction Design Best Practices Volume 1 covers the "tangibles" — visuals, words, and space — and explains how to implement signifiers, how to construct a visual hierarchy, and how to make interactions feel like real conversations.
  • Interaction Design Best Practices Volume 2 covers the "intangibles" — time, responsiveness, and behavior — and covers topics from animation to enjoyment.
  • Consistency in UI Design explains the role that consistency plays in learnability, reducing friction, and drawing attention to certain elements.

Altogether, the bundle includes 250 pages of best practices and 60 design examples.

Did I leave out your favorite UX e-book? Let me know in the comments.

About the Author

Jerry Cao is a content strategist at UXPin. In the past few years, he’s worked on improving website experiences through better content, design, and information architecture (IA). Join him on Twitter: @jerrycao_uxpin.

Read Next

Quick Overview of User Experience for Web Designers

Creating a Timeless User Experience

10 Free Web Design Books Worth Reading

10 Awesome UX Podcasts

The post 7 Free UX E-Books Worth Reading appeared first on Six Revisions.

Freelancers often struggle with how to price their services. There are many sites that offer salary data for full-time employees, but none that do so for freelancers.

We’ve managed to collect data about freelance hourly rates over at Bonsai, and we wanted to make it public, so we built Rate Explorer to make it easy for people to see our data on how much freelance designers and developers charge by the hour.

We obtained the data from among the 15,000+ freelancers that use our app. We supplemented it with user research surveys, and that added another few hundred data points.

Currently, we only have data from freelancers operating in the U.S. Once we gain a critical mass of hourly-rate data for other countries, we will share those as well.

Interesting Trends

We spotted some noteworthy trends by analyzing the data.

Developers earn 30% more than designers.

The hourly rates of designers (especially graphic designers) remain sticky at under $60 an hour at all geographies and experience levels.

In addition, whereas developers quickly begin increasing their hourly rates after gaining 3 years of experience, designers tend to increase their hourly rates at a slower pace.

Read: Why Designers Should Learn How to Code

The most common explanations we’ve heard for this trend are:

  • Design is a very competitive field
  • Lower barrier to entry for some types of design
  • Typically smaller project sizes

Freelancers in the Coastal regions have higher hourly rates than those in the Midwest and the South by an average of ~10%.

Freelancers in the West Coast and East Coast generally have higher hourly rates compared to freelancers based in the Midwest and South.

This trend was surprising to us because freelance design and dev jobs can easily be done remotely, so it would be reasonable to think that a freelancer’s location would not have a whole lot of influence in his/her hourly rate. The difference might be linked to the higher living costs in coastal regions, which in turn might necessitate higher hourly rates, — but this is just speculative.

Read: The Best Sites for Finding Remote Work

The biggest increase in hourly rates happens when freelancers reach 3–5 years of experience.

Across all skill types and geographies, freelancers significantly increase their hourly rates when they gain 3–5 years worth of experience.

Having spoken to some of our users, we’ve learned that this trend can be attributed to:

Read: Three Simple Steps to Maintaining a Razor-Sharp Skill Set

What This Data Can Mean for You

Pricing can be a complicated subject, and many factors should go into pricing your work. The Rate Explorer is most valuable as a directional indicator. Are you above, below, or within the average for similar freelancers?

Matthew Brown is the founder of Bonsai, a San-Francisco-based contract and payment app for freelancers. Connect with Matthew on Twitter and GitHub.

Read Next

7 Simple Ways to Raise Your Rates and Keep Your Clients

Making Money Designing Themes: What You Should Know

How I Earned A Lot More on Projects by Changing My Pricing Strategy

5 Tips for Making More Money as a Freelance Designer

The post A Look at the Hourly Rates of Freelance Designers and Developers appeared first on Six Revisions.

At the start of last year, I was in a tight spot.

I’m a freelance writer, and my steady flow of work had slowed down and dried up. In February 2014, I made just over $7,000. In February 2015, however, I made just under $2,000. That’s a 70% pay cut when compared to the previous year’s earnings.

With my income declining rapidly to the point at which it was well below my cost of living — one of the tricky aspects of living in Tokyo is that it’s one of the most expensive cities to live in — I was forced to take action.

I did what most freelancers did: I sent out email after email to my old clients.

The results were weak, one small project and a one-off gig.

So I decided to try something a little different and turned my shortage of work into an interesting marketing experiment.

From my own experience, and speaking with other freelancers, it seems like the typical freelancer’s response to a shortage of work plays out like this:

  1. After a few weeks without a project, begin to worry, and start contacting old clients.
  2. If that doesn’t work, start sending out cold email after cold email to new prospects.
  3. If there’s no response, go for low-budget jobs on sites like Upwork or Freelancer.com.
  4. Panic. Offer a huge discount to the prospects you meet, trapping yourself in the low-pay/low-reward freelance cycle that so many talented people end up being stuck in.

Basic analysis of this strategy shows that it doesn’t work. I know because I’ve experienced it myself, as have many of my friends who also freelance for a living. The truth is that low rates don’t sell. At least not with the type of awesome, high-quality clients you want.

A far stronger approach to getting more work and increasing your income is to focus on getting high-quality clients by selling to them really, really well.

It’s the "more wood behind fewer arrows" approach. Market your service to fewer prospective clients, but put much more effort into each one of them. I learned this concept from entrepreneur and business-growth advisor Bryan Harris (founder of Videofruit) who used it to market his video creation service to tech companies. The main idea is to offer so much value that it’s impossible for any prospective client to ignore you.

Sending Out Handwritten Letters

Here’s what I did to get my freelancing business going again.

Instead of sending cold emails, which are effective in bulk but have a terrible response rate, I snail-mailed handwritten letters to all of the companies I wanted to work with. The letters were mailed to design and digital marketing agencies throughout the U.S.

In total, I sent out just over 100 letters, half of which were hand-addressed, and half of which were written entirely by hand.

All of the letters contained this exact same message:

Hi [person’s name],

Do you work with freelance writers at [company’s name]?

I ask because I am a freelance writer from New Zealand and I would love to work with you. I write for big tech companies like [mention one of my previous clients], as well as small to mid-sized agencies. I can write press releases, blog posts, articles, website content, landing pages and more.

My content is extremely good and very modestly priced.

I understand you’re probably suspicious of letters you receive from strangers, so to ease your concerns I would be happy to write a few custom samples for you, free of charge.

If you’re interested, just send a letter to my return address.

Just kidding! You can email me at [my email address]. That’s definitely more convenient.

Looking forward to working out how I can help you in your role at [company’s name].

Best,

Nick Gibson

Along with the letter, I also included:

  • My business card
  • A page containing testimonials from my existing clients
  • Samples of my work

To find the right people to contact, I manually went through the Google results for search terms like "digital agency in [some city]" and found the person in charge of content and public relations. I tracked down their LinkedIn profile to check that they were the right person to contact, then wrote the letter and mailed it to them.

Since I was sending the letters from Japan, they were packaged in Japan Post envelopes with a Japanese postage stamp. I’m sure the novelty of receiving a hand-addressed letter from another country was one reason for the campaign’s success, since it instantly inspires curiosity.

The Results

All in all, I received 14 responses from the slightly more than 100 letters I sent out. It cost me about $200 to ship out all the letters, so it ended up being roughly $14 per lead.

Of the 14 responses, one made a significant 5-figure order and two others made small 3-figure deals with me. The 5-figure client has grown into one of my most important clients today.

I also followed up over the phone with the clients that didn’t respond to the letter. Almost all of them reported that they were amused and surprised about receiving a letter from a writer on the other side of the world, and many said I would be first in line for any extra writing work they had available in the future.

Final Thoughts

As a writer, letters are a great strategy. For designers, I think they’re even better. Imagine if you could put your favorite portfolio items right in front of a client on beautiful card paper instead of emailing them a link to your online portfolio or Dribbble account, hoping that they’ll click through and browse through your work.

If I were a freelance designer, I would try mailing out pop-up books with website layouts, cards with sample logos and testimonials from happy clients. As a developer, you can use the exact same strategy I did, but mention your previous development work instead of written content.

The point of all this is that sometimes it’s better to use "old fashioned" technology to market yourself, especially in an industry like design and development where the vast majority of marketing is done online.

Simply by doing something different, you can stand out in a very good way.

Since I started doing this in early-2015, I’ve had a steady flow of clients from the letters I’ve sent out. My rates are back to where they were before, and on occasion even better than before.

If you’re ever short on project work and can’t get a response with the typical way of cold-emailing prospective clients, give handwritten letters a try. It’s old fashioned, it’s unique, and it’s exactly what you need to do to get the attention of great clients and give your freelance business the push it needs.

Nick Gibson is a freelance writer who specializes in writing content for tech companies and marketing agencies. Originally from New Zealand, he’s currently based in Japan. Contact Nick through his website: njgibson.com.

Read Next

Aggressive Expansion: 8 Tips for Finding More Clients Now

5 Pricing Tips to Earn More on Client Projects

7 Ways to Get More Referrals for Your Web Design Business

5 Tips for Making More Money as a Freelance Designer

The post Can Handwritten Letters Get You More Clients? appeared first on Six Revisions.

Powered by WP Robot